Survival and persistence of Alternaria dauci in carrot cropping systems

Barry M Pryor, J. O. Strandberg, R. M. Davis, J. J. Nunez, R. L. Gilbertson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alternaria dauci was recovered in California from carrot crop residue and from volunteer carrot plants in fallow carrot fields. The fungus was not recovered from common weeds surrounding fallow fields. To evaluate further the survival of A. dauci on carrot crop residue, infected carrot leaf tissue was placed in fields or in soil in greenhouse pots, and recovered over time. In California, A. dauci was recovered from infected leaf tissue in both fallow and irrigated fields for as long as 1 year. In Florida, A. dauci was recovered from infected leaf tissue in fallow fields for up to 30 weeks. In greenhouse experiments, A. dauci was recovered from infected leaf tissue for as long as 1 year in dry soil, but only up to 30 weeks in soil that was watered weekly. To determine the infectivity of A. dauci borne on carrot crop residue, infected carrot crops were incorporated into organic and mineral field soils, and soil samples were collected over time. Carrot seed were planted in collected soil, and seedling infection by A. dauci was recorded. Seedling infection was detected up to 13 and 14 weeks after crop incorporation in organic and mineral soil, respectively. Seedling infection was detected for up to 5 weeks in soil that remained dry compared with 3 weeks in flooded soil.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1115-1122
Number of pages8
JournalPlant Disease
Volume86
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

Fingerprint

Alternaria dauci
carrots
cropping systems
fallow
crop residues
soil
seedlings
leaves
irrigated farming
infection
greenhouse soils
crops
greenhouse experimentation
organic soils
mineral soils
volunteers
pathogenicity
soil sampling
weeds
minerals

Keywords

  • Daucus carota
  • Disease management
  • Pathogen survival
  • Soilborne inoculum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Pryor, B. M., Strandberg, J. O., Davis, R. M., Nunez, J. J., & Gilbertson, R. L. (2002). Survival and persistence of Alternaria dauci in carrot cropping systems. Plant Disease, 86(10), 1115-1122.

Survival and persistence of Alternaria dauci in carrot cropping systems. / Pryor, Barry M; Strandberg, J. O.; Davis, R. M.; Nunez, J. J.; Gilbertson, R. L.

In: Plant Disease, Vol. 86, No. 10, 01.10.2002, p. 1115-1122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pryor, BM, Strandberg, JO, Davis, RM, Nunez, JJ & Gilbertson, RL 2002, 'Survival and persistence of Alternaria dauci in carrot cropping systems', Plant Disease, vol. 86, no. 10, pp. 1115-1122.
Pryor BM, Strandberg JO, Davis RM, Nunez JJ, Gilbertson RL. Survival and persistence of Alternaria dauci in carrot cropping systems. Plant Disease. 2002 Oct 1;86(10):1115-1122.
Pryor, Barry M ; Strandberg, J. O. ; Davis, R. M. ; Nunez, J. J. ; Gilbertson, R. L. / Survival and persistence of Alternaria dauci in carrot cropping systems. In: Plant Disease. 2002 ; Vol. 86, No. 10. pp. 1115-1122.
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