Survival of enteroviruses in rapid-infiltration basins during the land application of wastewater

C. J. Hurst, Charles P Gerba, J. C. Lance, R. C. Rice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The downward migration through soil of seeded poliovirus type 1 and echovirus type 1 and of naturally occuring enteroviruses during infiltration of sewage effluent through rapid-infiltration basins was investigated. After 5 days of flooding, the amount of seeded poliovirus type 1 that had migrated 5 to 10 cm downward through the soil profile was found to be 11% of that remaining at the initial burial depth. The amount of echovirus type 1 determined to have moved an equal distance was at least 100-fold less. Migration of naturally occurring enteroviruses during infiltration of sewage effluent through soil could not be measured with accuracy because of the possibility of virus survival from previous applications of effluent. The rate of inactivation for seeded poliovirus 1 and echovirus 1 buried in the infiltration basins ranged between 0.04 and 0.15 log10 units per day during the time when the basins were flooded. Inactivation of these same seeded virus types and of indigenous enterovirus populations in the infiltration basins during the drying portion of the sewage application cycle ranged between 0.11 and 0.52 log10 units per day. The rate of virus inactivation was dependent upon the rate of soil moisture loss. These results indicate that drying cycles during the land application of wastewater enhance virus inactivation in the soil.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-200
Number of pages9
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume40
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Enterovirus
land application
Waste Water
infiltration (hydrology)
wastewater
infiltration
Human Enterovirus B
Soil
Enterovirus C
Poliovirus
basins
virus
inactivation
Sewage
Survival
Virus Inactivation
sewage effluent
viruses
basin
sewage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Survival of enteroviruses in rapid-infiltration basins during the land application of wastewater. / Hurst, C. J.; Gerba, Charles P; Lance, J. C.; Rice, R. C.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 40, No. 2, 1980, p. 192-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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