Sustainable heritage tourism: Native american preservation recommendations at arches, canyonlands, and hovenweep national parks

Richard Stoffle, Octavius Seowtewa, Cameron Kays, Kathleen Van Vlack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The sustainable use of Native American heritage places is viewed in this analysis as serving to preserve their traditional purposes and sustaining the cultural landscapes that give them heritage meaning. The research concerns the potential impacts of heritage tourism to selected Native American places at Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Hovenweep National Monument. The impacts of tourists on a heritage place must be understood as having both potential effects on the place itself and on an integrated cultural landscape. Impacts to one place potentially change other places. Their functions in a Native American landscape, and the integrity of the landscape itself. The analysis is based on 696 interviews with representatives from nine tribes and pueblos, who, in addition to defining the cultural meaning of places, officially made 349 heritage management recommendations. The U.S. National Park Service interprets Natives American resources and then brings millions of tourists to these through museums, brochures, outdoor displays, and ranger-guided tours. Native American ethnographic study participants argued that tourist education and regulation can increase the sustainability of Native American places in a park and can help protect related places beyond the park.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9846
Pages (from-to)1-34
Number of pages34
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume12
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

Keywords

  • Arches National Park
  • Canyonlands National Park
  • Hovenweep National Park
  • Native American heritage places
  • Sustainable heritage tourism
  • United States National Parks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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