Sustaining wildlands: Integrating science and community in Prince William Sound

Aaron J. Poe, Randy Gimblett

Research output: Book/ReportBook

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska in 1989 and spilled 11 million gallons of oil, it changed Prince William Sound forever. The catastrophe disrupted the region's biological system, killing countless animals and poisoning habitats that to this day no longer support some of the local species. The effects have also profoundly altered the way people use this region. Nearly three decades later, changes in recreation use run counter to what was initially expected. Instead of avoiding Prince William Sound, tourists and visitors flock there. Economic revitalization efforts have resulted in increased wilderness access as new commercial enterprises offer nature tourism in remote bays and fjords. This increased visitation has caused concerns that the wilderness may again be threatened-not by oil but rather by the very humans seeking those wilderness experiences. In Sustaining Wildlands, scientists and managers, along with local community residents, address what has come to be a central paradox in public lands management: the need to accommodate increasing human use while reducing the environmental impact of those activities. This volume draws on diverse efforts and perspectives to dissect this paradox, offering an alternative approach where human use is central to sustaining wildlands and recovering a damaged ecosystem like Prince William Sound.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherUniversity of Arizona Press
Number of pages355
ISBN (Electronic)9780816537600
ISBN (Print)9780816535644
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Wilderness
wilderness
Oils
Ecosystem
oil
fjord
poisoning
land management
tankers
Estuaries
Recreation
oils
ecotourism
reef
public lands
environmental impact
tourism
tourists
recreation
Poisoning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Sustaining wildlands : Integrating science and community in Prince William Sound. / Poe, Aaron J.; Gimblett, Randy.

University of Arizona Press, 2017. 355 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

@book{208a4ef3be8c43279927c0d583fdb46a,
title = "Sustaining wildlands: Integrating science and community in Prince William Sound",
abstract = "When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska in 1989 and spilled 11 million gallons of oil, it changed Prince William Sound forever. The catastrophe disrupted the region's biological system, killing countless animals and poisoning habitats that to this day no longer support some of the local species. The effects have also profoundly altered the way people use this region. Nearly three decades later, changes in recreation use run counter to what was initially expected. Instead of avoiding Prince William Sound, tourists and visitors flock there. Economic revitalization efforts have resulted in increased wilderness access as new commercial enterprises offer nature tourism in remote bays and fjords. This increased visitation has caused concerns that the wilderness may again be threatened-not by oil but rather by the very humans seeking those wilderness experiences. In Sustaining Wildlands, scientists and managers, along with local community residents, address what has come to be a central paradox in public lands management: the need to accommodate increasing human use while reducing the environmental impact of those activities. This volume draws on diverse efforts and perspectives to dissect this paradox, offering an alternative approach where human use is central to sustaining wildlands and recovering a damaged ecosystem like Prince William Sound.",
author = "Poe, {Aaron J.} and Randy Gimblett",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780816535644",
publisher = "University of Arizona Press",

}

TY - BOOK

T1 - Sustaining wildlands

T2 - Integrating science and community in Prince William Sound

AU - Poe, Aaron J.

AU - Gimblett, Randy

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska in 1989 and spilled 11 million gallons of oil, it changed Prince William Sound forever. The catastrophe disrupted the region's biological system, killing countless animals and poisoning habitats that to this day no longer support some of the local species. The effects have also profoundly altered the way people use this region. Nearly three decades later, changes in recreation use run counter to what was initially expected. Instead of avoiding Prince William Sound, tourists and visitors flock there. Economic revitalization efforts have resulted in increased wilderness access as new commercial enterprises offer nature tourism in remote bays and fjords. This increased visitation has caused concerns that the wilderness may again be threatened-not by oil but rather by the very humans seeking those wilderness experiences. In Sustaining Wildlands, scientists and managers, along with local community residents, address what has come to be a central paradox in public lands management: the need to accommodate increasing human use while reducing the environmental impact of those activities. This volume draws on diverse efforts and perspectives to dissect this paradox, offering an alternative approach where human use is central to sustaining wildlands and recovering a damaged ecosystem like Prince William Sound.

AB - When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska in 1989 and spilled 11 million gallons of oil, it changed Prince William Sound forever. The catastrophe disrupted the region's biological system, killing countless animals and poisoning habitats that to this day no longer support some of the local species. The effects have also profoundly altered the way people use this region. Nearly three decades later, changes in recreation use run counter to what was initially expected. Instead of avoiding Prince William Sound, tourists and visitors flock there. Economic revitalization efforts have resulted in increased wilderness access as new commercial enterprises offer nature tourism in remote bays and fjords. This increased visitation has caused concerns that the wilderness may again be threatened-not by oil but rather by the very humans seeking those wilderness experiences. In Sustaining Wildlands, scientists and managers, along with local community residents, address what has come to be a central paradox in public lands management: the need to accommodate increasing human use while reducing the environmental impact of those activities. This volume draws on diverse efforts and perspectives to dissect this paradox, offering an alternative approach where human use is central to sustaining wildlands and recovering a damaged ecosystem like Prince William Sound.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038890427&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85038890427&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Book

AN - SCOPUS:85038890427

SN - 9780816535644

BT - Sustaining wildlands

PB - University of Arizona Press

ER -