Symbiotic Stars in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment Survey: The Case of LIN 358 and SMC N73 (LIN 445a)

Jasmin E. Washington, Hannah M. Lewis, Borja Anguiano, Steven R. Majewski, S. Drew Chojnowski, Verne V. Smith, Keivan G. Stassun, Carlos Allende Prieto, Katia Cunha, David L. Nidever, D. A. García-Hernández, Kaike Pan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

LIN 358 and SMC N73 are two symbiotic binaries in the halo of the Small Magellanic Cloud, each composed of a hot white dwarf accreting from a cool giant companion. In this work, we characterize these systems using a combination of spectral energy distribution (SED)-fitting to the extant photometric data spanning a broad wavelength range (X-ray/ultraviolet to near-infrared), detailed analysis of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) spectra for the giant stars, and orbit fitting to high quality radial velocities from the APOGEE database. Using the calculated Roche lobe radius for the giant component and the mass ratio for each system, it is found that LIN 358 is likely undergoing mass transfer via wind Roche lobe overflow, while the accretion mechanism for SMC N73 remains uncertain. This work presents the first orbital characterization for both of these systems (yielding periods of >270 and >980 days, respectively, for SMC N73 and LIN 358) and the first global SED fitting for SMC N73. In addition, variability was identified in APOGEE spectra of LIN 358 spanning 17 epochs over two years that may point to a time variable accretion rate as the product of an eccentric orbit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number19
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume918
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

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