Symptoms and self-care strategies in women with and without dysmenorrhea.

M. Jarrett, M. M. Heitkemper, Joan L Shaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the self-reports of women who reported either none-mild (N = 34) or moderate-extreme (N = 27) pain from uterine cramping regarding, (a) gastrointestinal, perimenstrual, and other symptoms during the 5 days before and after the beginning of menstrual flow; (b) smoking, alcohol use, exercise behaviors, and number of reported stressors; and (c) self-care strategies used for symptom management. Although there were significant differences between the two groups in reported symptoms, there were no significant between groups differences in smoking, alcohol use, exercise behaviors, and number of stressors reported. Despite the number of symptoms reported, relatively few self-care strategies were used. The most commonly reported strategy was the use of medication for cramping pain. The results confirm prior observations that dysmenorrhea is associated with a variety of symptoms and extend our understanding of how women manage these symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-178
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Care for Women International
Volume16
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dysmenorrhea
Self Care
Smoking
Alcohols
Exercise
Pain
Self Report

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Symptoms and self-care strategies in women with and without dysmenorrhea. / Jarrett, M.; Heitkemper, M. M.; Shaver, Joan L.

In: Health Care for Women International, Vol. 16, No. 2, 03.1995, p. 167-178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{559093a9d2b44741b2ed5d44cccdd013,
title = "Symptoms and self-care strategies in women with and without dysmenorrhea.",
abstract = "We compared the self-reports of women who reported either none-mild (N = 34) or moderate-extreme (N = 27) pain from uterine cramping regarding, (a) gastrointestinal, perimenstrual, and other symptoms during the 5 days before and after the beginning of menstrual flow; (b) smoking, alcohol use, exercise behaviors, and number of reported stressors; and (c) self-care strategies used for symptom management. Although there were significant differences between the two groups in reported symptoms, there were no significant between groups differences in smoking, alcohol use, exercise behaviors, and number of stressors reported. Despite the number of symptoms reported, relatively few self-care strategies were used. The most commonly reported strategy was the use of medication for cramping pain. The results confirm prior observations that dysmenorrhea is associated with a variety of symptoms and extend our understanding of how women manage these symptoms.",
author = "M. Jarrett and Heitkemper, {M. M.} and Shaver, {Joan L}",
year = "1995",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "167--178",
journal = "Health Care for Women International",
issn = "0739-9332",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Symptoms and self-care strategies in women with and without dysmenorrhea.

AU - Jarrett, M.

AU - Heitkemper, M. M.

AU - Shaver, Joan L

PY - 1995/3

Y1 - 1995/3

N2 - We compared the self-reports of women who reported either none-mild (N = 34) or moderate-extreme (N = 27) pain from uterine cramping regarding, (a) gastrointestinal, perimenstrual, and other symptoms during the 5 days before and after the beginning of menstrual flow; (b) smoking, alcohol use, exercise behaviors, and number of reported stressors; and (c) self-care strategies used for symptom management. Although there were significant differences between the two groups in reported symptoms, there were no significant between groups differences in smoking, alcohol use, exercise behaviors, and number of stressors reported. Despite the number of symptoms reported, relatively few self-care strategies were used. The most commonly reported strategy was the use of medication for cramping pain. The results confirm prior observations that dysmenorrhea is associated with a variety of symptoms and extend our understanding of how women manage these symptoms.

AB - We compared the self-reports of women who reported either none-mild (N = 34) or moderate-extreme (N = 27) pain from uterine cramping regarding, (a) gastrointestinal, perimenstrual, and other symptoms during the 5 days before and after the beginning of menstrual flow; (b) smoking, alcohol use, exercise behaviors, and number of reported stressors; and (c) self-care strategies used for symptom management. Although there were significant differences between the two groups in reported symptoms, there were no significant between groups differences in smoking, alcohol use, exercise behaviors, and number of stressors reported. Despite the number of symptoms reported, relatively few self-care strategies were used. The most commonly reported strategy was the use of medication for cramping pain. The results confirm prior observations that dysmenorrhea is associated with a variety of symptoms and extend our understanding of how women manage these symptoms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029266285&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029266285&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7759347

AN - SCOPUS:0029266285

VL - 16

SP - 167

EP - 178

JO - Health Care for Women International

JF - Health Care for Women International

SN - 0739-9332

IS - 2

ER -