Synthesis of Results from the CD-ROM Experiment

4-D Image of the Lithosphere Beneath the Rocky Mountains and Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Continental Lithosphere

CD-ROM Working Group

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The CD-ROM experiment has produced a new 4-D understanding of the structure and evolution of the lithosphere of the southern Rocky Mountain region. We identify relicts of at least four subduction zones that were formed during assembly of dominantly oceanic terranes in the Paleoproterozoic. Crustal provinces with different geologic histories correspond to distinct mantle velocity domains, with profound mantle velocity contrasts associated with the ancient sutures. Typically, the transitions between the velocity domains are tabular, dipping, extend from the base of the crust to depths of 15&200 km, and some contain dipping mantle anisotropy. The present day heterogeneous mantle structure, although strongly influenced by ancient compositional variations, has undergone different degrees of partial melting due to Cenozoic heating andlor hydration caused by transient plumes or asthenospheric convection within the wide western U.S. active plate margin. A high-velocity mafic lower crust is present throughout the Rocky Mountains, and there is ~10-km-scale Moho topography. Both are interpreted to record progressive and ongoing differentiation of lithosphere, and a Moho that has changed position due to flux of basalt from the mantle to the crust. The mafic lower crust evolved diachronously via concentration of mafic restite during arc formation (pre-1.70 Ga), collision-related differentiation and granite genesis (1.7s1.62 Ga), and several episodes of basaltic underplating (1.45-1.35 Ga, ~1.1 Ga, and Cenozoic). Epeirogenic uplift of the western U.S. and Rocky Mountain regions, driven by mantle magmatism, continues to cause reactivation of the heterogeneous lithosphere in the Cenozoic, resulting in differential uplift of the Rocky Mountains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Rocky Mountain Region: An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics, Geochemistry, and Geophysics
PublisherAmerican Geophysical Union
Pages421-441
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)9781118666326, 0875904181, 9780875904191
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2013

Fingerprint

Rocky Mountains (North America)
CD-ROM
lithosphere
Earth mantle
crusts
synthesis
dipping
granite
basalt
low speed
plumes
hydration
margins
topography
convection
arcs
assembly
melting
histories
anisotropy

Keywords

  • Core-mantle boundary
  • Geology, Structural-Rocky Mountains
  • Geophysics-Rocky Mountains
  • Orogeny-Rocky Mountains

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

CD-ROM Working Group (2013). Synthesis of Results from the CD-ROM Experiment: 4-D Image of the Lithosphere Beneath the Rocky Mountains and Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Continental Lithosphere. In The Rocky Mountain Region: An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics, Geochemistry, and Geophysics (pp. 421-441). American Geophysical Union. https://doi.org/10.1029/154GM31

Synthesis of Results from the CD-ROM Experiment : 4-D Image of the Lithosphere Beneath the Rocky Mountains and Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Continental Lithosphere. / CD-ROM Working Group.

The Rocky Mountain Region: An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics, Geochemistry, and Geophysics. American Geophysical Union, 2013. p. 421-441.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

CD-ROM Working Group 2013, Synthesis of Results from the CD-ROM Experiment: 4-D Image of the Lithosphere Beneath the Rocky Mountains and Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Continental Lithosphere. in The Rocky Mountain Region: An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics, Geochemistry, and Geophysics. American Geophysical Union, pp. 421-441. https://doi.org/10.1029/154GM31
CD-ROM Working Group. Synthesis of Results from the CD-ROM Experiment: 4-D Image of the Lithosphere Beneath the Rocky Mountains and Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Continental Lithosphere. In The Rocky Mountain Region: An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics, Geochemistry, and Geophysics. American Geophysical Union. 2013. p. 421-441 https://doi.org/10.1029/154GM31
CD-ROM Working Group. / Synthesis of Results from the CD-ROM Experiment : 4-D Image of the Lithosphere Beneath the Rocky Mountains and Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Continental Lithosphere. The Rocky Mountain Region: An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics, Geochemistry, and Geophysics. American Geophysical Union, 2013. pp. 421-441
@inbook{bdccf854db9b441c872d0c607297c7ef,
title = "Synthesis of Results from the CD-ROM Experiment: 4-D Image of the Lithosphere Beneath the Rocky Mountains and Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Continental Lithosphere",
abstract = "The CD-ROM experiment has produced a new 4-D understanding of the structure and evolution of the lithosphere of the southern Rocky Mountain region. We identify relicts of at least four subduction zones that were formed during assembly of dominantly oceanic terranes in the Paleoproterozoic. Crustal provinces with different geologic histories correspond to distinct mantle velocity domains, with profound mantle velocity contrasts associated with the ancient sutures. Typically, the transitions between the velocity domains are tabular, dipping, extend from the base of the crust to depths of 15&200 km, and some contain dipping mantle anisotropy. The present day heterogeneous mantle structure, although strongly influenced by ancient compositional variations, has undergone different degrees of partial melting due to Cenozoic heating andlor hydration caused by transient plumes or asthenospheric convection within the wide western U.S. active plate margin. A high-velocity mafic lower crust is present throughout the Rocky Mountains, and there is ~10-km-scale Moho topography. Both are interpreted to record progressive and ongoing differentiation of lithosphere, and a Moho that has changed position due to flux of basalt from the mantle to the crust. The mafic lower crust evolved diachronously via concentration of mafic restite during arc formation (pre-1.70 Ga), collision-related differentiation and granite genesis (1.7s1.62 Ga), and several episodes of basaltic underplating (1.45-1.35 Ga, ~1.1 Ga, and Cenozoic). Epeirogenic uplift of the western U.S. and Rocky Mountain regions, driven by mantle magmatism, continues to cause reactivation of the heterogeneous lithosphere in the Cenozoic, resulting in differential uplift of the Rocky Mountains.",
keywords = "Core-mantle boundary, Geology, Structural-Rocky Mountains, Geophysics-Rocky Mountains, Orogeny-Rocky Mountains",
author = "{CD-ROM Working Group} and Karlstrom, {Karl E.} and Whitmeyer, {Steven J.} and Ken Dueker and Williams, {Michael L.} and Bowring, {Samuel A.} and Levander, {Alan R.} and Humphreys, {E. D.} and {Randy Keller}, G. and Christopher Andronicos and Nicholas Bolay and Boyd, {Oliver S.} and Steve Cather and Kevin Chamberlain and Nick Christensen and Jim Crowley and Jason Crosswhite and David Coblentz and Tefera Eshete and Eric Erslev and Lang Farmer and Rebecca Flowers and Otina Fox and Matt Heizler and Gene Humphreys and Micah Jessup and Johnson, {Roy A} and Karl Karlstrom and Kelley, {Shari A.} and Eric Kirby and Alan Levander and {Beatrice Magnani}, M. and Kevin Mahan and Jennie Matzal and Annie McCoy and Grant Meyer and Kate Miller and Elena Morozova and Frank Pazzaglia and Claus Prodehl and Adam Read and Oscar Quezada and Mousurni Roy and Rumpel, {Hanna Maria} and Jane Selverstone and Anne Sheehan and Liane Stevens and Shaw, {Colin A.} and Elena Shoshitaishvili and Scott Smithson and Cathy Snelson",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1029/154GM31",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781118666326",
pages = "421--441",
booktitle = "The Rocky Mountain Region: An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics, Geochemistry, and Geophysics",
publisher = "American Geophysical Union",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Synthesis of Results from the CD-ROM Experiment

T2 - 4-D Image of the Lithosphere Beneath the Rocky Mountains and Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Continental Lithosphere

AU - CD-ROM Working Group

AU - Karlstrom, Karl E.

AU - Whitmeyer, Steven J.

AU - Dueker, Ken

AU - Williams, Michael L.

AU - Bowring, Samuel A.

AU - Levander, Alan R.

AU - Humphreys, E. D.

AU - Randy Keller, G.

AU - Andronicos, Christopher

AU - Bolay, Nicholas

AU - Boyd, Oliver S.

AU - Cather, Steve

AU - Chamberlain, Kevin

AU - Christensen, Nick

AU - Crowley, Jim

AU - Crosswhite, Jason

AU - Coblentz, David

AU - Eshete, Tefera

AU - Erslev, Eric

AU - Farmer, Lang

AU - Flowers, Rebecca

AU - Fox, Otina

AU - Heizler, Matt

AU - Humphreys, Gene

AU - Jessup, Micah

AU - Johnson, Roy A

AU - Karlstrom, Karl

AU - Kelley, Shari A.

AU - Kirby, Eric

AU - Levander, Alan

AU - Beatrice Magnani, M.

AU - Mahan, Kevin

AU - Matzal, Jennie

AU - McCoy, Annie

AU - Meyer, Grant

AU - Miller, Kate

AU - Morozova, Elena

AU - Pazzaglia, Frank

AU - Prodehl, Claus

AU - Read, Adam

AU - Quezada, Oscar

AU - Roy, Mousurni

AU - Rumpel, Hanna Maria

AU - Selverstone, Jane

AU - Sheehan, Anne

AU - Stevens, Liane

AU - Shaw, Colin A.

AU - Shoshitaishvili, Elena

AU - Smithson, Scott

AU - Snelson, Cathy

PY - 2013/3/19

Y1 - 2013/3/19

N2 - The CD-ROM experiment has produced a new 4-D understanding of the structure and evolution of the lithosphere of the southern Rocky Mountain region. We identify relicts of at least four subduction zones that were formed during assembly of dominantly oceanic terranes in the Paleoproterozoic. Crustal provinces with different geologic histories correspond to distinct mantle velocity domains, with profound mantle velocity contrasts associated with the ancient sutures. Typically, the transitions between the velocity domains are tabular, dipping, extend from the base of the crust to depths of 15&200 km, and some contain dipping mantle anisotropy. The present day heterogeneous mantle structure, although strongly influenced by ancient compositional variations, has undergone different degrees of partial melting due to Cenozoic heating andlor hydration caused by transient plumes or asthenospheric convection within the wide western U.S. active plate margin. A high-velocity mafic lower crust is present throughout the Rocky Mountains, and there is ~10-km-scale Moho topography. Both are interpreted to record progressive and ongoing differentiation of lithosphere, and a Moho that has changed position due to flux of basalt from the mantle to the crust. The mafic lower crust evolved diachronously via concentration of mafic restite during arc formation (pre-1.70 Ga), collision-related differentiation and granite genesis (1.7s1.62 Ga), and several episodes of basaltic underplating (1.45-1.35 Ga, ~1.1 Ga, and Cenozoic). Epeirogenic uplift of the western U.S. and Rocky Mountain regions, driven by mantle magmatism, continues to cause reactivation of the heterogeneous lithosphere in the Cenozoic, resulting in differential uplift of the Rocky Mountains.

AB - The CD-ROM experiment has produced a new 4-D understanding of the structure and evolution of the lithosphere of the southern Rocky Mountain region. We identify relicts of at least four subduction zones that were formed during assembly of dominantly oceanic terranes in the Paleoproterozoic. Crustal provinces with different geologic histories correspond to distinct mantle velocity domains, with profound mantle velocity contrasts associated with the ancient sutures. Typically, the transitions between the velocity domains are tabular, dipping, extend from the base of the crust to depths of 15&200 km, and some contain dipping mantle anisotropy. The present day heterogeneous mantle structure, although strongly influenced by ancient compositional variations, has undergone different degrees of partial melting due to Cenozoic heating andlor hydration caused by transient plumes or asthenospheric convection within the wide western U.S. active plate margin. A high-velocity mafic lower crust is present throughout the Rocky Mountains, and there is ~10-km-scale Moho topography. Both are interpreted to record progressive and ongoing differentiation of lithosphere, and a Moho that has changed position due to flux of basalt from the mantle to the crust. The mafic lower crust evolved diachronously via concentration of mafic restite during arc formation (pre-1.70 Ga), collision-related differentiation and granite genesis (1.7s1.62 Ga), and several episodes of basaltic underplating (1.45-1.35 Ga, ~1.1 Ga, and Cenozoic). Epeirogenic uplift of the western U.S. and Rocky Mountain regions, driven by mantle magmatism, continues to cause reactivation of the heterogeneous lithosphere in the Cenozoic, resulting in differential uplift of the Rocky Mountains.

KW - Core-mantle boundary

KW - Geology, Structural-Rocky Mountains

KW - Geophysics-Rocky Mountains

KW - Orogeny-Rocky Mountains

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84951128985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84951128985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1029/154GM31

DO - 10.1029/154GM31

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781118666326

SN - 0875904181

SN - 9780875904191

SP - 421

EP - 441

BT - The Rocky Mountain Region: An Evolving Lithosphere: Tectonics, Geochemistry, and Geophysics

PB - American Geophysical Union

ER -