Synthesizing Environmental Flow Needs Data for Water Management in a Water-Scarce State: The Arizona Environmental Water Demands Database

Kelly - Mott Lacroix, B. C. Xiu, J. B. Nadeau, Sharon B Megdal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Water rights for environmental flows are not universal, and oftentimes, legal tools used to incorporate the environment into water management only require new users to consider their impact. It can be difficult to include the needs of riparian and aquatic ecosystems in new plans when relevant information is not always available, especially when other existing uses already outstrip available supplies. There is a need for easily accessible and understandable science on the water requirements for riparian and aquatic species, so managers can make informed decisions about whether or not to include riparian and aquatic species in their community's water management future. In this paper, we describe the current understanding of the link between hydrology and Arizona's riparian and aquatic ecosystems through the creation of a geospatial Environmental Water Demands database that can be used to determine the water needs to maintain habitat. Analysis of 121 studies reveals that there are very few analyses of the surface water and groundwater requirements for intermittent or ephemeral river systems, and there are only limited generalizable data for aquatic species. Except for a few species, such as Cottonwood (Populous fremontii) and Willow (Salix gooddingii), few data are available on the flow requirements for vegetation. The Environmental Water Demands database can be used to identify critical geographic and topical knowledge gaps where further research is needed, as well as serve as a single place for water and land managers to assess and use the most currently available information to make more informed management decisions and recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-244
Number of pages11
JournalRiver Research and Applications
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Water management
water demand
water management
Water
aquatic ecosystem
Salix
Aquatic ecosystems
water
Managers
river system
hydrology
Hydrology
surface water
Surface waters
groundwater
need
Groundwater
vegetation
habitat
Rivers

Keywords

  • Aquatic ecosystems
  • Decision support tool
  • Ecohydrology
  • Environmental flows
  • Riparian ecosystems
  • Water policy and management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

@article{b20eb0a282e44951b3df8e36c4b390dc,
title = "Synthesizing Environmental Flow Needs Data for Water Management in a Water-Scarce State: The Arizona Environmental Water Demands Database",
abstract = "Water rights for environmental flows are not universal, and oftentimes, legal tools used to incorporate the environment into water management only require new users to consider their impact. It can be difficult to include the needs of riparian and aquatic ecosystems in new plans when relevant information is not always available, especially when other existing uses already outstrip available supplies. There is a need for easily accessible and understandable science on the water requirements for riparian and aquatic species, so managers can make informed decisions about whether or not to include riparian and aquatic species in their community's water management future. In this paper, we describe the current understanding of the link between hydrology and Arizona's riparian and aquatic ecosystems through the creation of a geospatial Environmental Water Demands database that can be used to determine the water needs to maintain habitat. Analysis of 121 studies reveals that there are very few analyses of the surface water and groundwater requirements for intermittent or ephemeral river systems, and there are only limited generalizable data for aquatic species. Except for a few species, such as Cottonwood (Populous fremontii) and Willow (Salix gooddingii), few data are available on the flow requirements for vegetation. The Environmental Water Demands database can be used to identify critical geographic and topical knowledge gaps where further research is needed, as well as serve as a single place for water and land managers to assess and use the most currently available information to make more informed management decisions and recommendations.",
keywords = "Aquatic ecosystems, Decision support tool, Ecohydrology, Environmental flows, Riparian ecosystems, Water policy and management",
author = "{Mott Lacroix}, {Kelly -} and Xiu, {B. C.} and Nadeau, {J. B.} and Megdal, {Sharon B}",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/rra.2858",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "234--244",
journal = "River Research and Applications",
issn = "1535-1459",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synthesizing Environmental Flow Needs Data for Water Management in a Water-Scarce State

T2 - The Arizona Environmental Water Demands Database

AU - Mott Lacroix, Kelly -

AU - Xiu, B. C.

AU - Nadeau, J. B.

AU - Megdal, Sharon B

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Water rights for environmental flows are not universal, and oftentimes, legal tools used to incorporate the environment into water management only require new users to consider their impact. It can be difficult to include the needs of riparian and aquatic ecosystems in new plans when relevant information is not always available, especially when other existing uses already outstrip available supplies. There is a need for easily accessible and understandable science on the water requirements for riparian and aquatic species, so managers can make informed decisions about whether or not to include riparian and aquatic species in their community's water management future. In this paper, we describe the current understanding of the link between hydrology and Arizona's riparian and aquatic ecosystems through the creation of a geospatial Environmental Water Demands database that can be used to determine the water needs to maintain habitat. Analysis of 121 studies reveals that there are very few analyses of the surface water and groundwater requirements for intermittent or ephemeral river systems, and there are only limited generalizable data for aquatic species. Except for a few species, such as Cottonwood (Populous fremontii) and Willow (Salix gooddingii), few data are available on the flow requirements for vegetation. The Environmental Water Demands database can be used to identify critical geographic and topical knowledge gaps where further research is needed, as well as serve as a single place for water and land managers to assess and use the most currently available information to make more informed management decisions and recommendations.

AB - Water rights for environmental flows are not universal, and oftentimes, legal tools used to incorporate the environment into water management only require new users to consider their impact. It can be difficult to include the needs of riparian and aquatic ecosystems in new plans when relevant information is not always available, especially when other existing uses already outstrip available supplies. There is a need for easily accessible and understandable science on the water requirements for riparian and aquatic species, so managers can make informed decisions about whether or not to include riparian and aquatic species in their community's water management future. In this paper, we describe the current understanding of the link between hydrology and Arizona's riparian and aquatic ecosystems through the creation of a geospatial Environmental Water Demands database that can be used to determine the water needs to maintain habitat. Analysis of 121 studies reveals that there are very few analyses of the surface water and groundwater requirements for intermittent or ephemeral river systems, and there are only limited generalizable data for aquatic species. Except for a few species, such as Cottonwood (Populous fremontii) and Willow (Salix gooddingii), few data are available on the flow requirements for vegetation. The Environmental Water Demands database can be used to identify critical geographic and topical knowledge gaps where further research is needed, as well as serve as a single place for water and land managers to assess and use the most currently available information to make more informed management decisions and recommendations.

KW - Aquatic ecosystems

KW - Decision support tool

KW - Ecohydrology

KW - Environmental flows

KW - Riparian ecosystems

KW - Water policy and management

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959361023&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959361023&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/rra.2858

DO - 10.1002/rra.2858

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84959361023

VL - 32

SP - 234

EP - 244

JO - River Research and Applications

JF - River Research and Applications

SN - 1535-1459

IS - 3

ER -