Teaching classical control system course with portable student-owned mechatronic kits

Eniko T Enikov, Estelle Eke

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Teaching classical controls systems design to mechanical engineering students presents unique challenges. While most mechanical engineering programs prepare students to be wellversed in the application of physical principles and modeling aspects of physical systems, implementation of closed loop control and system-level analysis is lagging. It is not uncommon that students report difficulty in conceptualizing even common controls systems terms such as steady-state error and disturbance rejection. Typically, most courses focus on the theoretical analysis and modeling, but students are left asking the questions... How do I implement a phase-lead compensator? ...What is a non-minimum phase system? This paper presents an innovative approach in teaching control systems design course based on the use of a low-cost apparatus that has the ability to directly communicate with MATLAB and its Simulink toolbox, allowing students to drag-and-drop controllers and immediately test their effect on the response of the physical plant. The setup consists of a DC micro-motor driving a propeller attached to a carbon-fiber rod. The angular displacement of the rod is measured with an analog potentiometer, which acts as the pivot point for the carbon fiber rod. The miniature circuit board is powered by the USB port of a laptop and communicates to the host computer using the a virtual COM port. MATLAB/Simulink communicates to the board using its serial port read/write blocks to command the motor and detect the deflection angle. This presentation describes a typical semester-long experimental protocol facilitated by the low-cost kit. The kit allows demonstration of classical PID, phase lead and lag controllers, as well as non-linear feedback linearization techniques. Comparison between student gains before and after the introduction of the mechatronic kits are also provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings (IMECE)
Pages509-516
Number of pages8
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
EventASME 2012 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2012 - Houston, TX, United States
Duration: Nov 9 2012Nov 15 2012

Other

OtherASME 2012 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2012
CountryUnited States
CityHouston, TX
Period11/9/1211/15/12

Fingerprint

Mechatronics
Teaching
Students
Control systems
Mechanical engineering
MATLAB
Carbon fibers
Systems analysis
Controllers
Feedback linearization
Disturbance rejection
Propellers
Closed loop systems
Drag
Costs
Demonstrations
Lead
Network protocols
Networks (circuits)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Enikov, E. T., & Eke, E. (2012). Teaching classical control system course with portable student-owned mechatronic kits. In ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings (IMECE) (Vol. 5, pp. 509-516) https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2012-86700

Teaching classical control system course with portable student-owned mechatronic kits. / Enikov, Eniko T; Eke, Estelle.

ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings (IMECE). Vol. 5 2012. p. 509-516.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Enikov, ET & Eke, E 2012, Teaching classical control system course with portable student-owned mechatronic kits. in ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings (IMECE). vol. 5, pp. 509-516, ASME 2012 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2012, Houston, TX, United States, 11/9/12. https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2012-86700
Enikov ET, Eke E. Teaching classical control system course with portable student-owned mechatronic kits. In ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings (IMECE). Vol. 5. 2012. p. 509-516 https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2012-86700
Enikov, Eniko T ; Eke, Estelle. / Teaching classical control system course with portable student-owned mechatronic kits. ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Proceedings (IMECE). Vol. 5 2012. pp. 509-516
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