Teaching the science of safety in US colleges and schools of pharmacy

David A. Holdford, Terri L Warholak, Donna West-Strum, John P. Bentley, Daniel C Malone, John E Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper provides baseline information on integrating the science of safety into the professional degree curriculum at colleges and schools of pharmacy. A multi-method examination was conducted that included a literature review, key informant interviews of 30 individuals, and in-depth case studies of 5 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Educators believe that they are devoting adequate time to science of safety topics and doing a good job teaching students to identify, understand, report, manage, and communicate medication risk. Areas perceived to be in need of improvement include educating pharmacy students about the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) role in product safety, how to work with the FDA in post-marketing surveillance and other FDA safety initiatives, teaching students methods to improve safety, and educating students to practice in interprofessional teams. The report makes 10 recommendations to help pharmacy school graduates be more effective in protecting patients from preventable drug-related problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Pharmacy Schools
Teaching
Safety
United States Food and Drug Administration
science
school
Students
student
examination method
school graduate
Pharmacy Students
surveillance
Marketing
medication
marketing
Curriculum
educator
drug
curriculum
Interviews

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • FDA
  • Pharmacy education
  • Quality
  • Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Teaching the science of safety in US colleges and schools of pharmacy. / Holdford, David A.; Warholak, Terri L; West-Strum, Donna; Bentley, John P.; Malone, Daniel C; Murphy, John E.

In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, Vol. 75, No. 4, 01.01.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{27ef48fd842649b699cd9060b8bcaa66,
title = "Teaching the science of safety in US colleges and schools of pharmacy",
abstract = "This paper provides baseline information on integrating the science of safety into the professional degree curriculum at colleges and schools of pharmacy. A multi-method examination was conducted that included a literature review, key informant interviews of 30 individuals, and in-depth case studies of 5 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Educators believe that they are devoting adequate time to science of safety topics and doing a good job teaching students to identify, understand, report, manage, and communicate medication risk. Areas perceived to be in need of improvement include educating pharmacy students about the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) role in product safety, how to work with the FDA in post-marketing surveillance and other FDA safety initiatives, teaching students methods to improve safety, and educating students to practice in interprofessional teams. The report makes 10 recommendations to help pharmacy school graduates be more effective in protecting patients from preventable drug-related problems.",
keywords = "Curriculum, FDA, Pharmacy education, Quality, Safety",
author = "Holdford, {David A.} and Warholak, {Terri L} and Donna West-Strum and Bentley, {John P.} and Malone, {Daniel C} and Murphy, {John E}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5688/ajpe75477",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
journal = "American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education",
issn = "0002-9459",
publisher = "American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Teaching the science of safety in US colleges and schools of pharmacy

AU - Holdford, David A.

AU - Warholak, Terri L

AU - West-Strum, Donna

AU - Bentley, John P.

AU - Malone, Daniel C

AU - Murphy, John E

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - This paper provides baseline information on integrating the science of safety into the professional degree curriculum at colleges and schools of pharmacy. A multi-method examination was conducted that included a literature review, key informant interviews of 30 individuals, and in-depth case studies of 5 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Educators believe that they are devoting adequate time to science of safety topics and doing a good job teaching students to identify, understand, report, manage, and communicate medication risk. Areas perceived to be in need of improvement include educating pharmacy students about the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) role in product safety, how to work with the FDA in post-marketing surveillance and other FDA safety initiatives, teaching students methods to improve safety, and educating students to practice in interprofessional teams. The report makes 10 recommendations to help pharmacy school graduates be more effective in protecting patients from preventable drug-related problems.

AB - This paper provides baseline information on integrating the science of safety into the professional degree curriculum at colleges and schools of pharmacy. A multi-method examination was conducted that included a literature review, key informant interviews of 30 individuals, and in-depth case studies of 5 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Educators believe that they are devoting adequate time to science of safety topics and doing a good job teaching students to identify, understand, report, manage, and communicate medication risk. Areas perceived to be in need of improvement include educating pharmacy students about the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) role in product safety, how to work with the FDA in post-marketing surveillance and other FDA safety initiatives, teaching students methods to improve safety, and educating students to practice in interprofessional teams. The report makes 10 recommendations to help pharmacy school graduates be more effective in protecting patients from preventable drug-related problems.

KW - Curriculum

KW - FDA

KW - Pharmacy education

KW - Quality

KW - Safety

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046979831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85046979831&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5688/ajpe75477

DO - 10.5688/ajpe75477

M3 - Article

C2 - 21769153

AN - SCOPUS:85046979831

VL - 75

JO - American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

JF - American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

SN - 0002-9459

IS - 4

ER -