Telepathology. Long-distance diagnosis

Ronald S Weinstein, K. J. Bloom, L. S. Rozek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Telepathology is defined as the practice of pathology at a distance, by visualizing an image on a video monitor rather than viewing a specimen directly through a microscope. Components of a telepathology system include the following: (1) a workstation equipped with a high-resolution video camera attached to a remote-controlled light microscope; (2) a pathologist workstation incorporating controls for manipulating the robotic microscope as well as a high-resolution video monitor; and (3) a telecommunications link. Progress has been made in designing and constructing telepathology workstations and fully motorized, computer-controlled light microscopes suitable for telepathology. In addition, components such as video signal digital encoders and decoders that produce remarkably stable, high-color fidelity, and high-resolution images have been incorporated into the workstations. Resolution requirements for the video microscopy component of telepathology have been formally examined in receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Test-of-concept demonstrations have been completed with the use of geostationary satellites as the broadband communication linkages for 750-line resolution video. Potential benefits of telepathology include providing a means of conveniently delivering pathology services in real-time to remote sites or underserviced areas, time-sharing of pathologists' services by multiple institutions, and increasing accessibility to specialty pathologists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume91
Issue number4 SUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Telepathology
Pathology
Telecommunications
Light
Video Microscopy
Robotics
Color
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Telepathology. Long-distance diagnosis. / Weinstein, Ronald S; Bloom, K. J.; Rozek, L. S.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 91, No. 4 SUPPL. 1, 1989.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weinstein, RS, Bloom, KJ & Rozek, LS 1989, 'Telepathology. Long-distance diagnosis', American Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 91, no. 4 SUPPL. 1.
Weinstein, Ronald S ; Bloom, K. J. ; Rozek, L. S. / Telepathology. Long-distance diagnosis. In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 1989 ; Vol. 91, No. 4 SUPPL. 1.
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