Temperament Styles of Zimbabwe and U.S. Children

Thomas Oakland, Elias Mpofu, Michael L Sulkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Temperament styles of 600 Zimbabwe children are described and compared to those of 3,200 U.S. children. Gender and age differences are described for children in Zimbabwe and compared to U.S. children. Results indicate that Zimbabwe children generally prefer extroverted to introverted styles, practical to imaginative styles, feeling to thinking styles, and organized to flexible styles. Gender differences were found on one style: in contrast to males, females are more likely to prefer extroverted styles. Age differences are seen on extroversion-introversion, thinking-feeling, and organized-flexible styles. In contrast to U.S. children, those in Zimbabwe tend to express higher preferences for practical, feeling, and organized styles. Implications for practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-153
Number of pages15
JournalCanadian Journal of School Psychology
Volume21
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Zimbabwe
Temperament
Emotions

Keywords

  • children
  • cross-cultural
  • temperament
  • Zimbabwe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Temperament Styles of Zimbabwe and U.S. Children. / Oakland, Thomas; Mpofu, Elias; Sulkowski, Michael L.

In: Canadian Journal of School Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 1-2, 2006, p. 139-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oakland, Thomas ; Mpofu, Elias ; Sulkowski, Michael L. / Temperament Styles of Zimbabwe and U.S. Children. In: Canadian Journal of School Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 21, No. 1-2. pp. 139-153.
@article{c9040daec0304ba7a2edb41495f4fe2b,
title = "Temperament Styles of Zimbabwe and U.S. Children",
abstract = "Temperament styles of 600 Zimbabwe children are described and compared to those of 3,200 U.S. children. Gender and age differences are described for children in Zimbabwe and compared to U.S. children. Results indicate that Zimbabwe children generally prefer extroverted to introverted styles, practical to imaginative styles, feeling to thinking styles, and organized to flexible styles. Gender differences were found on one style: in contrast to males, females are more likely to prefer extroverted styles. Age differences are seen on extroversion-introversion, thinking-feeling, and organized-flexible styles. In contrast to U.S. children, those in Zimbabwe tend to express higher preferences for practical, feeling, and organized styles. Implications for practice are discussed.",
keywords = "children, cross-cultural, temperament, Zimbabwe",
author = "Thomas Oakland and Elias Mpofu and Sulkowski, {Michael L}",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1177/0829573506298838",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "139--153",
journal = "Canadian Journal of School Psychology",
issn = "0829-5735",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temperament Styles of Zimbabwe and U.S. Children

AU - Oakland, Thomas

AU - Mpofu, Elias

AU - Sulkowski, Michael L

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Temperament styles of 600 Zimbabwe children are described and compared to those of 3,200 U.S. children. Gender and age differences are described for children in Zimbabwe and compared to U.S. children. Results indicate that Zimbabwe children generally prefer extroverted to introverted styles, practical to imaginative styles, feeling to thinking styles, and organized to flexible styles. Gender differences were found on one style: in contrast to males, females are more likely to prefer extroverted styles. Age differences are seen on extroversion-introversion, thinking-feeling, and organized-flexible styles. In contrast to U.S. children, those in Zimbabwe tend to express higher preferences for practical, feeling, and organized styles. Implications for practice are discussed.

AB - Temperament styles of 600 Zimbabwe children are described and compared to those of 3,200 U.S. children. Gender and age differences are described for children in Zimbabwe and compared to U.S. children. Results indicate that Zimbabwe children generally prefer extroverted to introverted styles, practical to imaginative styles, feeling to thinking styles, and organized to flexible styles. Gender differences were found on one style: in contrast to males, females are more likely to prefer extroverted styles. Age differences are seen on extroversion-introversion, thinking-feeling, and organized-flexible styles. In contrast to U.S. children, those in Zimbabwe tend to express higher preferences for practical, feeling, and organized styles. Implications for practice are discussed.

KW - children

KW - cross-cultural

KW - temperament

KW - Zimbabwe

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84993804258&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84993804258&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0829573506298838

DO - 10.1177/0829573506298838

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 139

EP - 153

JO - Canadian Journal of School Psychology

JF - Canadian Journal of School Psychology

SN - 0829-5735

IS - 1-2

ER -