Template-guided self-assembly of dots using plasma lithography

Michael Junkin, Jennifer Watson, Jonathan P Vande Geest, Pak Kin Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study was conducted to demonstrate the performance of plasma lithography as a technique to pattern different surfaces to guide the self-assembly of quantum dots and other nanoscale building blocks. Plasma lithography was used to achieve pattern resolution of 100nm to 1 cm in size using simple procedures and equipment and to provide control over the resultant quantum-dot density. The fabrication method involved creating a nanoscale mold with 3D topography that when placed in contact with a substrate can shield selective areas of the substrate from the modification of a plasma, while allowed plasma surface treatment with other exposed areas. 3D molds were placed on polystyrene substrates during plasma treatment to spatially functionalize the polystyrene surface to create templates for self-assembly of quantum dots. It was concluded that the plasma lithography technique can be used for biomedical, material science, and nanophotonic applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1247-1251
Number of pages5
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 26 2009

Fingerprint

Self assembly
Lithography
Plasmas
Semiconductor quantum dots
Polystyrenes
Substrates
Nanophotonics
Molds
Materials science
Topography
Surface treatment
Fabrication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Template-guided self-assembly of dots using plasma lithography. / Junkin, Michael; Watson, Jennifer; Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Wong, Pak Kin.

In: Advanced Materials, Vol. 21, No. 12, 26.03.2009, p. 1247-1251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Junkin, Michael ; Watson, Jennifer ; Vande Geest, Jonathan P ; Wong, Pak Kin. / Template-guided self-assembly of dots using plasma lithography. In: Advanced Materials. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 12. pp. 1247-1251.
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