Teparies in southwestern North America - A biogeographical and ethnohistorical study of Phaseolus acutifolius

Gary P Nabhan, Richard S. Felger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ethnohistorically, wild and domesticated teparies (Phaseolus acutifolius: Leguminosae) are significant native food crops in southwestern North America. Their value rests in adaptations to arid environments, and high protein content and productivity. Use of wild teparies appears to be discontinued, but certain domesticated varieties are still grown by local commercial and subsistence farmers. The recent subsidence of tepary cultivation is related to breakdown of traditional economies and land use, and to the introduction of energy-intensive irrigated agriculture. An earlier and unsuccessful attempt to introduce teparies into modern agriculture was poorly timed. Teparies have considerable potential for low maintenance agriculture in arid and semi-arid lands.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-19
Number of pages17
JournalEconomic Botany
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1978

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Phaseolus acutifolius
agriculture
subsidence
dry environmental conditions
food crops
arid lands
Fabaceae
land use
protein content
farmers
energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Teparies in southwestern North America - A biogeographical and ethnohistorical study of Phaseolus acutifolius. / Nabhan, Gary P; Felger, Richard S.

In: Economic Botany, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.1978, p. 3-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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