Terror Management Theory and Self-Esteem: Evidence That Increased Self-Esteem Reduces Mortality Salience Effects

Eddie Harmon-Jones, Linda Simon, Jeff L Greenberg, Sheldon Solomon, Tom Pyszczynski, Holly McGregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

411 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On the basis of the terror management theory proposition that self-esteem provides protection against concerns about mortality, it was hypothesized that self-esteem would reduce the worldview defense produced by mortality salience (MS). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 confirmed this hypothesis by showing that individuals with high self-esteem (manipulated in Experiment 1; dispositional in Experiment 2) did not respond to MS with increased worldview defense, whereas individuals with moderate self-esteem did. The results of Experiment 3 suggested that the effects of the first 2 experiments may have occurred because high self-esteem facilitates the suppression of death constructs following MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-36
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume72
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Self Concept
self-esteem
terrorism
mortality
Mortality
experiment
management
evidence
worldview
suppression
death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Terror Management Theory and Self-Esteem : Evidence That Increased Self-Esteem Reduces Mortality Salience Effects. / Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Simon, Linda; Greenberg, Jeff L; Solomon, Sheldon; Pyszczynski, Tom; McGregor, Holly.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 72, No. 1, 01.1997, p. 24-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harmon-Jones, Eddie ; Simon, Linda ; Greenberg, Jeff L ; Solomon, Sheldon ; Pyszczynski, Tom ; McGregor, Holly. / Terror Management Theory and Self-Esteem : Evidence That Increased Self-Esteem Reduces Mortality Salience Effects. In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1997 ; Vol. 72, No. 1. pp. 24-36.
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