Testing the interactivity principle: Effects of mediation, propinquity, and verbal and nonverbal modalities in interpersonal interaction

Judee K Burgoon, Joseph A Bonito, Artemio Jr Ramirez, Norah E. Dunbar, Karadeen Kam, Jenna Fischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

215 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Early channel reliance research compared different modes of communication to asses relationships among nonverbal and verbal cues. Emerging communication technologies represent a new venue for gaining insights into the same relationships. In this article, the authors advance a principle of interactivity as a framework for decomposing some of those relationships and report an experiment in which physical proximity-whether actors are in the same place ("co-located") or interacting at a distance ("distributed")-and the availability of other nonverbal environmental, auditory, and visual information in distributed modes is varied. Results indicate that both proximity and availability of nonverbal cues affect communication processes, social judgments participants make about each other and task performance. The authors discuss implications about gains and losses due to presence of nonverbal features.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-677
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Communication
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

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interactive media
mediation
social judgement
communication
Communication
Testing
interaction
Availability
communication technology
experiment
performance
Modality
Interpersonal Interaction
Interactivity
Mediation
Experiments
Proximity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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Testing the interactivity principle : Effects of mediation, propinquity, and verbal and nonverbal modalities in interpersonal interaction. / Burgoon, Judee K; Bonito, Joseph A; Ramirez, Artemio Jr; Dunbar, Norah E.; Kam, Karadeen; Fischer, Jenna.

In: Journal of Communication, Vol. 52, No. 3, 09.2002, p. 657-677.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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