Texting for Health

The Use of Participatory Methods to Develop Healthy Lifestyle Messages for Teens

Melanie D Hingle, Mimi Nichter, Melanie Medeiros, Samantha Grace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To develop and test messages and a mobile phone delivery protocol designed to influence the nutrition and physical activity knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of adolescents. Design: Nine focus groups, 4 classroom discussions, and an 8-week pilot study exploring message content, format, origin, and message delivery were conducted over 12 months using a multistage, youth-participatory approach. Setting: Youth programs at 11 locations in Arizona. Participants: Recruitment was coordinated through youth educators and leaders. Eligible teens were 12-18 years old and enrolled in youth programs between fall 2009 and 2010. Phenomenon of Interest: Adolescent preferences for messages and delivery of messages. Analysis: Qualitative data analysis procedures to generate themes from field notes. Results: One hundred seventy-seven adolescents participated in focus groups (n = 59), discussions (n = 86), and a pilot study (n = 32). Youth preferred messages with an active voice that referenced teens and recommended specific, achievable behaviors; messages should come from nutrition professionals delivered as a text message, at a frequency of ≤ 2 messages/day. Conclusions and Implications: More than 300 messages and a delivery protocol were successfully developed and tested in partnership with adolescents. Future research should address scalability of texting interventions; explore dose associated with changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors; and offer customized message subscription options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-19
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Text Messaging
Health
Focus Groups
Healthy Lifestyle
Adolescent Behavior
Cell Phones

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Diet
  • Health education
  • Mobile health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Texting for Health : The Use of Participatory Methods to Develop Healthy Lifestyle Messages for Teens. / Hingle, Melanie D; Nichter, Mimi; Medeiros, Melanie; Grace, Samantha.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 12-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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