The accuracy of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and latex agglutination progesterone test for the validation of estrus and early pregnancy diagnosis in dairy cattle

D. Romagnolo, R. L. Nebel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The accuracy of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the latex agglutination (LA) on-farm progesterone kit for detecting estrus and diagnosing early pregnancy was investigated in this study. Italian Friesian dairy cows (n=82) from 6 dairy herds were used for the collection of foremilk samples at the time of breeding and at 19, 21, and 23 days post insemination. Pregnancy status was ascertained by uterine palpation per rectum 40 to 60 days post insemination. Progesterone levels were affected by herd, percentage of milk fat, and the day of testing × diagnosis interaction. Validation of estrus by qualitative on-farm tests was 74.6% (LA) and 100.0% (ELISA) accurate using 0.5 ng/ml of progesterone as the RIA estimate for estrus. The accuracy rate for early pregnancy diagnosis by RIA was 68.4 to 83.8% for day 19 and day 21, respectively, while the detection rate for nonpregnancy was 84.6 to 100% on day 19 and day 21, respectively, as compared with uterine palpation per rectum. The average accuracy rate for early pregnancy diagnosis ranged from 84.7 to 92.3% for the LA and ELISA tests, respectively; the nonpregnancy rate was correctly predicted 93.9% to 68.2% for the LA and ELISA tests, respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1121-1128
Number of pages8
JournalTheriogenology
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • estrus
  • pregnancy diagnosis
  • progesterone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals
  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Equine

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