The anglo-norman "Hugo de Lincolnia"

A critical edition and translation from the unique text in Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France MS fr. 902

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This edition makes available a critical text with an annotated translation of the Anglo-Norman verse narrative "Hugo de Lincolnia," one of the Boy Crucifixion sources of the Prioress's Tale. The Anglo-Norman text has heretofore been available in print only in a flawed nineteenth-century edition. "Hugo de Lincolnia" dates to the third quarter of the thirteenth century. It is the only extant contemporary vernacular account of the death of "Little Saint Hugh," a Christian boy said to have been crucified by Lincoln Jews in 1255 in mockery of Christ's Passion. In its author's superior familiarity with the Lincoln setting, the poem supplements the better-known contemporary accounts in Latin prose by Matthew Paris and the anonymous monastic chroniclers of Burton and Waverley.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-38
Number of pages38
JournalChaucer Review
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Critical Edition
France
Anglo-Norman
Boys
Poem
Critical Texts
Latin Language
Passion of Christ
Supplements
Familiarity
Waverley
Jews
Prose
Verse
Crucifixion
Chroniclers
Mockery
Matthew Paris

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

@article{7ba28daba09b4001a78288ca06aa6b4c,
title = "The anglo-norman {"}Hugo de Lincolnia{"}: A critical edition and translation from the unique text in Paris, Biblioth{\`e}que nationale de France MS fr. 902",
abstract = "This edition makes available a critical text with an annotated translation of the Anglo-Norman verse narrative {"}Hugo de Lincolnia,{"} one of the Boy Crucifixion sources of the Prioress's Tale. The Anglo-Norman text has heretofore been available in print only in a flawed nineteenth-century edition. {"}Hugo de Lincolnia{"} dates to the third quarter of the thirteenth century. It is the only extant contemporary vernacular account of the death of {"}Little Saint Hugh,{"} a Christian boy said to have been crucified by Lincoln Jews in 1255 in mockery of Christ's Passion. In its author's superior familiarity with the Lincoln setting, the poem supplements the better-known contemporary accounts in Latin prose by Matthew Paris and the anonymous monastic chroniclers of Burton and Waverley.",
author = "Dahood, {Roger -}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1353/cr.2014.0019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "1--38",
journal = "The Chaucer Review",
issn = "0009-2002",
publisher = "Penn State University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The anglo-norman "Hugo de Lincolnia"

T2 - A critical edition and translation from the unique text in Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France MS fr. 902

AU - Dahood, Roger -

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - This edition makes available a critical text with an annotated translation of the Anglo-Norman verse narrative "Hugo de Lincolnia," one of the Boy Crucifixion sources of the Prioress's Tale. The Anglo-Norman text has heretofore been available in print only in a flawed nineteenth-century edition. "Hugo de Lincolnia" dates to the third quarter of the thirteenth century. It is the only extant contemporary vernacular account of the death of "Little Saint Hugh," a Christian boy said to have been crucified by Lincoln Jews in 1255 in mockery of Christ's Passion. In its author's superior familiarity with the Lincoln setting, the poem supplements the better-known contemporary accounts in Latin prose by Matthew Paris and the anonymous monastic chroniclers of Burton and Waverley.

AB - This edition makes available a critical text with an annotated translation of the Anglo-Norman verse narrative "Hugo de Lincolnia," one of the Boy Crucifixion sources of the Prioress's Tale. The Anglo-Norman text has heretofore been available in print only in a flawed nineteenth-century edition. "Hugo de Lincolnia" dates to the third quarter of the thirteenth century. It is the only extant contemporary vernacular account of the death of "Little Saint Hugh," a Christian boy said to have been crucified by Lincoln Jews in 1255 in mockery of Christ's Passion. In its author's superior familiarity with the Lincoln setting, the poem supplements the better-known contemporary accounts in Latin prose by Matthew Paris and the anonymous monastic chroniclers of Burton and Waverley.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84906306853&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84906306853&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1353/cr.2014.0019

DO - 10.1353/cr.2014.0019

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 1

EP - 38

JO - The Chaucer Review

JF - The Chaucer Review

SN - 0009-2002

IS - 1

ER -