The antimalarial amodiaquine causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade sensitizing human melanoma cells to starvation- And chemotherapy-induced cell death

Shuxi Qiao, Shasha Tao, Montserrat Rojo De La Vega, Sophia L. Park, Amanda A. Vonderfecht, Suesan L. Jacobs, Donna Zhang, Georg T Wondrak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pharmacological inhibition of autophagic-lysosomal function has recently emerged as a promising strategy for chemotherapeutic intervention targeting cancer cells. Repurposing approved and abandoned non-oncological drugs is an alternative approach to the identification and development of anticancer therapeutics, and antimalarials that target autophagic-lysosomal functions have recently attracted considerable attention as candidates for oncological repurposing. Since cumulative research suggests that dependence on autophagy represents a specific vulnerability of malignant melanoma cells, we screened a focused compound library of antimalarials for antimelanoma activity. Here we report for the first time that amodiaquine (AQ), a clinical 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial with unexplored cancer-directed chemotherapeutic potential, causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade in melanoma cells that surpasses that of its parent compound chloroquine. Monitoring an established set of protein markers (LAMP1, LC3-II, SQSTM1) and cell ultrastructural changes detected by electron microscopy, we observed that AQ treatment caused autophagic-lysosomal blockade in malignant A375 melanoma cells, a finding substantiated by detection of rapid inactivation of lysosomal cathepsins (CTSB, CTSL, CTSD). AQ-treatment was associated with early induction of energy crisis (ATP depletion) and sensitized melanoma cells to either starvation- or chemotherapeutic agent-induced cell death. AQ displayed potent antiproliferative effects, and gene expression array analysis revealed changes at the mRNA (CDKN1A , E2F1) and protein level (TP53, CDKN1A, CCND1, phospho-RB1 [Ser 780]/[Ser 807/811], E2F1) consistent with the observed proliferative blockade in S-phase. Taken together, our data suggest that the clinical antimalarial AQ is a promising candidate for repurposing efforts that aim at targeting autophagic-lysosomal function and proliferative control in malignant melanoma cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2087-2102
Number of pages16
JournalAutophagy
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Amodiaquine
Antimalarials
Starvation
Melanoma
Cell Death
Drug Therapy
Lysosomal-Associated Membrane Protein 1
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21
Cathepsins
Autophagy
Chloroquine
S Phase
Neoplasms
Electron Microscopy
Therapeutics
Adenosine Triphosphate
Pharmacology
Gene Expression
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Amodiaquine
  • Autophagy
  • Cathepsin
  • CDKN1A
  • Chloroquine
  • E2F1
  • Lysosome
  • Malignant melanoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

The antimalarial amodiaquine causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade sensitizing human melanoma cells to starvation- And chemotherapy-induced cell death. / Qiao, Shuxi; Tao, Shasha; Rojo De La Vega, Montserrat; Park, Sophia L.; Vonderfecht, Amanda A.; Jacobs, Suesan L.; Zhang, Donna; Wondrak, Georg T.

In: Autophagy, Vol. 9, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 2087-2102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qiao, Shuxi ; Tao, Shasha ; Rojo De La Vega, Montserrat ; Park, Sophia L. ; Vonderfecht, Amanda A. ; Jacobs, Suesan L. ; Zhang, Donna ; Wondrak, Georg T. / The antimalarial amodiaquine causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade sensitizing human melanoma cells to starvation- And chemotherapy-induced cell death. In: Autophagy. 2013 ; Vol. 9, No. 12. pp. 2087-2102.
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