The Association Between Overinvolved Parenting and Young Adults’ Self-Efficacy, Psychological Entitlement, and Family Communication

Michelle Givertz, Chris Segrin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study sought to examine the association between parental behavior indicative of overinvolvement and control and young adult child self-identity, namely self-efficacy and psychological entitlement. Participants in this study were 339 parent-young adult child dyads who completed survey measures of family environment, parenting, family communication, and family satisfaction. Young adults also completed measures of self-efficacy and entitlement. Results showed that balanced family adaptability and cohesion, open family communication, and authoritative rather than authoritarian parenting, were positively associated with parents’ and young adults’ family satisfaction. Parental behavior that emphasized control over the child was associated with diminished self-efficacy and exaggerated psychological entitlement in young adult children. The relationship between these two classes of variables was amplified by open parent-child communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1111-1136
Number of pages26
JournalCommunication Research
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 2014

Keywords

  • adaptability
  • cohesion
  • family communication
  • family satisfaction
  • parenting styles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

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