The Association Between Professional Performing Arts and Knowledge Class Growth: Implications for Metropolitan Economic Development

Arthur Christian Nelson, Casey J. Dawkins, Joanna P. Ganning, Katherine G. Kittrell, Reid Ewing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Economic development in the current century may favor those metropolitan areas that attract the “knowledge class.” This study provides a cross-sectional analysis associating the presence of one or more professional symphony, opera, or ballet/dance organizations with knowledge class growth. The authors find that the presence of one type of such organization is associated with a 1.1% change in knowledge class employment over the period from 2000 to 2010, two types are associated with a 1.5% change, and all three are associated with a 2.2% change. Between 2000 and 2010, the presence of at least one professional performing arts organization is associated with about 540,000 knowledge class jobs, generating about $60 billion in annual income among those 118 metropolitan areas with professional performing arts organizations. Metropolitan economic development implications are offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-98
Number of pages11
JournalEconomic Development Quarterly
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • economic development
  • knowledge class
  • professional performing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Development
  • Urban Studies

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