THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF A NINE-HOT-JUPITER SAMPLE: PROBING CIRCULATION AND CHEMISTRY OVER A WIDE PHASE SPACE

Tiffany Kataria, David K. Sing, Nikole K. Lewis, Channon Visscher, Adam Showman, Jonathan J. Fortney, Mark S. Marley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present results from an atmospheric circulation study of nine hot Jupiters that compose a large transmission spectral survey using the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. These observations exhibit a range of spectral behavior over optical and infrared wavelengths, suggesting diverse cloud and haze properties in their atmospheres. By utilizing the specific system parameters for each planet, we naturally probe a wide phase space in planet radius, gravity, orbital period, and equilibrium temperature. First, we show that our model "grid" recovers trends shown in traditional parametric studies of hot Jupiters, particularly equatorial superrotation and increased day-night temperature contrast with increasing equilibrium temperature. We show how spatial temperature variations, particularly between the dayside and nightside and west and east terminators, can vary by hundreds of kelvin, which could imply large variations in Na, K, CO and CH4 abundances in those regions. These chemical variations can be large enough to be observed in transmission with high-resolution spectrographs, such as ESPRESSO on VLT, METIS on the E-ELT, or MIRI and NIRSpec aboard JWST. We also compare theoretical emission spectra generated from our models to available Spitzer eclipse depths for each planet and find that the outputs from our solar-metallicity, cloud-free models generally provide a good match to many of the data sets, even without additional model tuning. Although these models are cloud-free, we can use their results to understand the chemistry and dynamics that drive cloud formation in their atmospheres.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume821
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 2016

Fingerprint

atmospheric circulation
Jupiter (planet)
Jupiter
chemistry
planets
planet
superrotation
temperature
atmospheres
James Webb Space Telescope
Space Infrared Telescope Facility
haze
atmosphere
eclipses
Hubble Space Telescope
night
spectrographs
metallicity
emission spectra
tuning

Keywords

  • atmospheric effects
  • methods: numerical
  • planets and satellites: general

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF A NINE-HOT-JUPITER SAMPLE : PROBING CIRCULATION AND CHEMISTRY OVER A WIDE PHASE SPACE. / Kataria, Tiffany; Sing, David K.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Visscher, Channon; Showman, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.

In: Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 821, No. 1, 9, 10.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kataria, Tiffany ; Sing, David K. ; Lewis, Nikole K. ; Visscher, Channon ; Showman, Adam ; Fortney, Jonathan J. ; Marley, Mark S. / THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF A NINE-HOT-JUPITER SAMPLE : PROBING CIRCULATION AND CHEMISTRY OVER A WIDE PHASE SPACE. In: Astrophysical Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 821, No. 1.
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