The atomic force microscope: A tool for science and industry

S. A.C. Gould, B. Drake, C. B. Prater, A. L. Weisenhorn, S. Manne, G. L. Kelderman, H. J. Butt, H. Hansma, P. K. Hansma, S. Magonov, H. J. Cantow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Images of graphite and RuCl3 show that the atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of imaging rigid samples with atomic resolution. Images of photographic film showing the emulsion demonstrate the potential of the microscope for industrial quality control. An image of a stoma on a leaf shows that the microscope is gentle enough not to damage surfaces, even of soft biological samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-98
Number of pages6
JournalUltramicroscopy
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1990
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Instrumentation

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    Gould, S. A. C., Drake, B., Prater, C. B., Weisenhorn, A. L., Manne, S., Kelderman, G. L., Butt, H. J., Hansma, H., Hansma, P. K., Magonov, S., & Cantow, H. J. (1990). The atomic force microscope: A tool for science and industry. Ultramicroscopy, 33(2), 93-98. https://doi.org/10.1016/0304-3991(90)90011-A