The bidirectional and directional hemispheric reflectance of Apollo 11 and 16 soils: Laboratory and diviner measurements

Emily J. Foote, David A. Paige, Michael K. Shepard, Jeffrey R. Johnson, Stuart Biggar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have acquired a comprehensive laboratory bidirectional measurements of Apollo 11 and Apollo 16 lunar soil samples and have successfully fit photometric models to the laboratory data and have determined the solar spectrum averaged hemispheric reflectance as a function of incidence angle. The Apollo 11 (sample 10,084) and 16 (sample 68,810) soil samples are two representative end member samples from the Moon, dark lunar maria and bright lunar highlands. We used our solar spectrum averaged albedos in a thermal model and compared our model-calculated normal bolometric infrared emission curves with those measured by the LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment. We found excellent agreement at the Apollo 11 site, but at the Apollo 16 site, we found that the albedos we measured in the laboratory were 33% brighter than those required to fit the Diviner infrared data. We attribute this difference at Apollo 16 to increased compaction and decreased maturity of the laboratory sample relative to the natural lunar surface, and to local variability in surface albedos at the Apollo 16 field area that are below the spatial resolution of Diviner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number113456
JournalIcarus
Volume336
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2020

Fingerprint

soils
reflectance
albedo
solar spectra
soil
lunar soil
lunar maria
radiometer
Moon
compaction
highlands
lunar surface
spatial resolution
moon
radiometers
laboratory
incidence
experiment
curves

Keywords

  • Moon
  • Photometry
  • Radiative transfer
  • Surface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

The bidirectional and directional hemispheric reflectance of Apollo 11 and 16 soils : Laboratory and diviner measurements. / Foote, Emily J.; Paige, David A.; Shepard, Michael K.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Biggar, Stuart.

In: Icarus, Vol. 336, 113456, 15.01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foote, Emily J. ; Paige, David A. ; Shepard, Michael K. ; Johnson, Jeffrey R. ; Biggar, Stuart. / The bidirectional and directional hemispheric reflectance of Apollo 11 and 16 soils : Laboratory and diviner measurements. In: Icarus. 2020 ; Vol. 336.
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