The Black identity, hair product use, and breast cancer scale

Dede Teteh, Marissa Ericson, Sabine Monice, Lenna Dawkins-Moultin, Nasim Bahadorani, Phyllis Clark, Eudora Mitchell, Lindsey S. Treviño, Adana Llanos, Rick Kittles, Susanne Montgomery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction Across the African Diaspora, hair is synonymous with identity. As such, Black women use a variety of hair products, which often contain more endocrine-disrupting chemicals than products used by women of other races. An emerging body of research is linking chemicals in hair products to breast cancer, but there is no validated instrument that measures constructs related to hair, identity, and breast health. The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Black Identity, Hair Product Use, and Breast Cancer Scale (BHBS) in a diverse sample of Black women to measure the social and cultural constructs associated with Black women’s hair product use and perceived breast cancer risk. Methods Participants completed a 27-item scale that queried perceptions of identity, hair products, and breast cancer risk. Principal Component Analyses (PCA) were conducted to establish the underlying component structures, and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine model fit. Results Participants (n = 185) were African American (73%), African, and Caribbean Black women (27%) aged 29 to 64. PCA yielded two components that accounted for 61% of total variance. Five items measuring sociocultural perspectives about hair and identity loaded on subscale 1 and accounted for 32% of total variance (α = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.77–0.86). Six items assessing perceived breast cancer risk related to hair product use loaded on subscale 2 and accounted for 29% of total variance (α = 0.82 (95% CI = 0.74–0.86). CFA confirmed the two-component structure (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = 0.03; Comparative Fit Index = 0.91; Tucker Lewis Index = 0.88). Conclusions The BHBS is a valid measure of social and cultural constructs associated with Black women’s hair product use and perceived breast cancer risk. This scale is useful for studies that assess cultural norms in the context of breast cancer risk for Black women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0225305
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

breast neoplasms
Hair
hairs
Breast Neoplasms
Factor analysis
Endocrine Disruptors
Principal Component Analysis
Mean square error
Statistical Factor Analysis
Health
endocrine-disrupting chemicals
African Americans
breasts
Breast
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Teteh, D., Ericson, M., Monice, S., Dawkins-Moultin, L., Bahadorani, N., Clark, P., ... Montgomery, S. (2019). The Black identity, hair product use, and breast cancer scale. PloS one, 14(12), [e0225305]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0225305

The Black identity, hair product use, and breast cancer scale. / Teteh, Dede; Ericson, Marissa; Monice, Sabine; Dawkins-Moultin, Lenna; Bahadorani, Nasim; Clark, Phyllis; Mitchell, Eudora; Treviño, Lindsey S.; Llanos, Adana; Kittles, Rick; Montgomery, Susanne.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 12, e0225305, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teteh, D, Ericson, M, Monice, S, Dawkins-Moultin, L, Bahadorani, N, Clark, P, Mitchell, E, Treviño, LS, Llanos, A, Kittles, R & Montgomery, S 2019, 'The Black identity, hair product use, and breast cancer scale', PloS one, vol. 14, no. 12, e0225305. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0225305
Teteh D, Ericson M, Monice S, Dawkins-Moultin L, Bahadorani N, Clark P et al. The Black identity, hair product use, and breast cancer scale. PloS one. 2019 Jan 1;14(12). e0225305. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0225305
Teteh, Dede ; Ericson, Marissa ; Monice, Sabine ; Dawkins-Moultin, Lenna ; Bahadorani, Nasim ; Clark, Phyllis ; Mitchell, Eudora ; Treviño, Lindsey S. ; Llanos, Adana ; Kittles, Rick ; Montgomery, Susanne. / The Black identity, hair product use, and breast cancer scale. In: PloS one. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 12.
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abstract = "Introduction Across the African Diaspora, hair is synonymous with identity. As such, Black women use a variety of hair products, which often contain more endocrine-disrupting chemicals than products used by women of other races. An emerging body of research is linking chemicals in hair products to breast cancer, but there is no validated instrument that measures constructs related to hair, identity, and breast health. The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Black Identity, Hair Product Use, and Breast Cancer Scale (BHBS) in a diverse sample of Black women to measure the social and cultural constructs associated with Black women’s hair product use and perceived breast cancer risk. Methods Participants completed a 27-item scale that queried perceptions of identity, hair products, and breast cancer risk. Principal Component Analyses (PCA) were conducted to establish the underlying component structures, and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine model fit. Results Participants (n = 185) were African American (73{\%}), African, and Caribbean Black women (27{\%}) aged 29 to 64. PCA yielded two components that accounted for 61{\%} of total variance. Five items measuring sociocultural perspectives about hair and identity loaded on subscale 1 and accounted for 32{\%} of total variance (α = 0.82; 95{\%} CI = 0.77–0.86). Six items assessing perceived breast cancer risk related to hair product use loaded on subscale 2 and accounted for 29{\%} of total variance (α = 0.82 (95{\%} CI = 0.74–0.86). CFA confirmed the two-component structure (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = 0.03; Comparative Fit Index = 0.91; Tucker Lewis Index = 0.88). Conclusions The BHBS is a valid measure of social and cultural constructs associated with Black women’s hair product use and perceived breast cancer risk. This scale is useful for studies that assess cultural norms in the context of breast cancer risk for Black women.",
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