The Carbon, Oxygen, and Clumped Isotopic Composition of Soil Carbonate in Archeology

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The stable isotopic composition of soil carbonate is a powerful means of reconstructing past environments. Carbon isotopes allow archeologists to reconstruct the proportions of C3 and C4 plants, from which the overall extent of woody cover can be calculated, at least at lower latitudes. Oxygen isotopes provide a view of past climate, including moisture sources, soil evaporation, and, in some cases, paleotemperature. Clumped isotopes also allow soil temperatures to be reconstructed, which in modern soils and under seasonal climates reflect the warmest months of the year. On archeological (Quaternary) timescales, the isotopic composition of soil carbonate is very resistant to alteration and should be a robust, albeit low-resolution source of paleoenvironmental information for archeologists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTreatise on Geochemistry: Second Edition
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages129-143
Number of pages15
Volume14
ISBN (Print)9780080983004
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

Carbonates
archaeology
isotopic composition
Carbon
Oxygen
Soils
carbonate
oxygen
carbon
Chemical analysis
soil
Oxygen Isotopes
C4 plant
C3 plant
Carbon Isotopes
paleotemperature
climate
soil temperature
carbon isotope
oxygen isotope

Keywords

  • Carbon isotopes
  • Clumped isotopes
  • Oxygen isotopes
  • Soil carbonate
  • Soil temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

The Carbon, Oxygen, and Clumped Isotopic Composition of Soil Carbonate in Archeology. / Quade, Jay.

Treatise on Geochemistry: Second Edition. Vol. 14 Elsevier Inc., 2013. p. 129-143.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Quade, Jay. / The Carbon, Oxygen, and Clumped Isotopic Composition of Soil Carbonate in Archeology. Treatise on Geochemistry: Second Edition. Vol. 14 Elsevier Inc., 2013. pp. 129-143
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