The combined impact of maternal age and body mass index on cumulative live birth following in vitro fertilization

Randi H. Goldman, Leslie V. Farland, Ann Muir Thomas, Chloe A. Zera, Elizabeth S. Ginsburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It is critical to evaluate the combined impact of age and body mass index on the cumulative likelihood of live birth following in vitro fertilization, as achieving a lower body mass index before infertility treatment often is recommended for women with overweight and obesity. It is important to consider whether achieving a particular body mass index, thus resulting in an older age at in vitro fertilization cycle start, is beneficial or harmful to the likelihood of live birth. Objectives: To evaluate the combined impact of age and body mass index on the cumulative live birth rate following in vitro fertilization to inform when delaying in vitro fertilization treatment to achieve a lower body mass index may be beneficial or detrimental to the likelihood of live birth. Study Design: This is a retrospective study using linked fresh and cryopreserved/frozen cycles from January 2014 to December 2015 from the Society for Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System, representing >90% of in vitro fertilization cycles performed in the United States. The primary outcome was live birth as measured by cumulative live birth rate. Secondary outcomes included implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, and miscarriage rate. Poisson and logistic regression were used to calculate risk and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals to determine differences in implantation, clinical pregnancy, and miscarriage, as appropriate, among first fresh in vitro fertilization cycles compared across age (years) and body mass index (kg/m2) categories. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals to determine differences in the cumulative live birth rate using fresh plus linked frozen embryo transfer cycles. Results: There were 51,959 first fresh cycles using autologous eggs and 16,067 subsequent frozen embryo transfer cycles. There were 21,395 live births, for an overall cumulative live birth rate of 41.2% per cycle start. The implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, and cumulative live birth rate decreased with increasing body mass index and age, and the miscarriage rate increased with increasing body mass index and age (linear trend P<.001 for all). Body mass index had a greater influence on live birth at younger ages as compared with older ages. Conclusions: Age-related decline in fertility has a greater impact than body mass index on the cumulative live birth rate at older ages, suggesting that taking time to achieve lower body mass index before in vitro fertilization may be detrimental for older women with overweight or obesity. Delaying conception to lose weight before in vitro fertilization should be informed by the combination of age and body mass index.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)617.e1-617.e13
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume221
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

Fingerprint

Maternal Age
Live Birth
Fertilization in Vitro
Body Mass Index
Birth Rate
Spontaneous Abortion
Embryo Transfer
Pregnancy Rate
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Reproductive Techniques
Infertility
Eggs
Fertility
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • body mass index
  • cumulative live birth rate
  • in vitro fertilization
  • infertility
  • maternal age
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

The combined impact of maternal age and body mass index on cumulative live birth following in vitro fertilization. / Goldman, Randi H.; Farland, Leslie V.; Thomas, Ann Muir; Zera, Chloe A.; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.

In: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, Vol. 221, No. 6, 12.2019, p. 617.e1-617.e13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldman, Randi H. ; Farland, Leslie V. ; Thomas, Ann Muir ; Zera, Chloe A. ; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S. / The combined impact of maternal age and body mass index on cumulative live birth following in vitro fertilization. In: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology. 2019 ; Vol. 221, No. 6. pp. 617.e1-617.e13.
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abstract = "Background: It is critical to evaluate the combined impact of age and body mass index on the cumulative likelihood of live birth following in vitro fertilization, as achieving a lower body mass index before infertility treatment often is recommended for women with overweight and obesity. It is important to consider whether achieving a particular body mass index, thus resulting in an older age at in vitro fertilization cycle start, is beneficial or harmful to the likelihood of live birth. Objectives: To evaluate the combined impact of age and body mass index on the cumulative live birth rate following in vitro fertilization to inform when delaying in vitro fertilization treatment to achieve a lower body mass index may be beneficial or detrimental to the likelihood of live birth. Study Design: This is a retrospective study using linked fresh and cryopreserved/frozen cycles from January 2014 to December 2015 from the Society for Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System, representing >90{\%} of in vitro fertilization cycles performed in the United States. The primary outcome was live birth as measured by cumulative live birth rate. Secondary outcomes included implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, and miscarriage rate. Poisson and logistic regression were used to calculate risk and odds ratios with 95{\%} confidence intervals to determine differences in implantation, clinical pregnancy, and miscarriage, as appropriate, among first fresh in vitro fertilization cycles compared across age (years) and body mass index (kg/m2) categories. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios with 95{\%} confidence intervals to determine differences in the cumulative live birth rate using fresh plus linked frozen embryo transfer cycles. Results: There were 51,959 first fresh cycles using autologous eggs and 16,067 subsequent frozen embryo transfer cycles. There were 21,395 live births, for an overall cumulative live birth rate of 41.2{\%} per cycle start. The implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, and cumulative live birth rate decreased with increasing body mass index and age, and the miscarriage rate increased with increasing body mass index and age (linear trend P<.001 for all). Body mass index had a greater influence on live birth at younger ages as compared with older ages. Conclusions: Age-related decline in fertility has a greater impact than body mass index on the cumulative live birth rate at older ages, suggesting that taking time to achieve lower body mass index before in vitro fertilization may be detrimental for older women with overweight or obesity. Delaying conception to lose weight before in vitro fertilization should be informed by the combination of age and body mass index.",
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