The contribution of mindfulness practice to a multicomponent behavioral sleep intervention following substance abuse treatment in adolescents: A treatment-development study

Willoughby B. Britton, Richard R Bootzin, Jennifer C. Cousins, Brant P. Hasler, Tucker Peck, Shauna L. Shapiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poor sleep is common in substance use disorders (SUDs) and is a risk factor for relapse. Within the context of a multicomponent, mindfulness-based sleep intervention that included mindfulness meditation (MM) for adolescent outpatients with SUDs (n = 55), this analysis assessed the contributions of MM practice intensity to gains in sleep quality and self-efficacy related to SUDs. Eighteen adolescents completed a 6-session study intervention and questionnaires on psychological distress, sleep quality, mindfulness practice, and substance use at baseline, 8, 20, and 60 weeks postentry. Program participation was associated with improvements in sleep and emotional distress, and reduced substance use. MM practice frequency correlated with increased sleep duration and improvement in self-efficacy about substance use. Increased sleep duration was associated with improvements in psychological distress, relapse resistance, and substance use-related problems. These findings suggest that sleep is an important therapeutic target in substance abusing adolescents and that MM may be a useful component to promote improved sleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-97
Number of pages12
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

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Mindfulness
Substance-Related Disorders
Sleep
Meditation
Therapeutics
Self Efficacy
Psychology
Recurrence
Outpatients

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
  • Sleep
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The contribution of mindfulness practice to a multicomponent behavioral sleep intervention following substance abuse treatment in adolescents : A treatment-development study. / Britton, Willoughby B.; Bootzin, Richard R; Cousins, Jennifer C.; Hasler, Brant P.; Peck, Tucker; Shapiro, Shauna L.

In: Substance Abuse, Vol. 31, No. 2, 04.2010, p. 86-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Britton, Willoughby B. ; Bootzin, Richard R ; Cousins, Jennifer C. ; Hasler, Brant P. ; Peck, Tucker ; Shapiro, Shauna L. / The contribution of mindfulness practice to a multicomponent behavioral sleep intervention following substance abuse treatment in adolescents : A treatment-development study. In: Substance Abuse. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 86-97.
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