The cooling white dwarf in VW hydri after normal outburst and superoutburst: HST evidence of a sustained accretion belt

Edward M. Sion, F. U Hua Cheng, Min Huang, Ivan - Hubeny, Paula Szkody

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Hubble Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) observations of VW Hyi one day after the end of a normal dwarf nova outburst reveal a heated white dwarf with deep, broad Lyα, narrow metallic absorption features, and evidence of a hotter Keplerian-broadened component manifested in quiescence as a broad continuum hump. Our best reduced χ2 fit to the data reveals (1) a DAZQ white dwarf with Teff= 22,500 ± 500 K, log g = 8, and photospheric abundances C = 0.5 solar, N = 5.0 solar, O = 2.0 solar, Si = 0.2 solar, Fe = 0.5 solar, with all other metals being 0.3 solar, and (2) a rapidly spinning accretion belt with Vrot = 3350 km s-1, Tbelt = 26,000 ± 1000 K, log g = 6.0, and a fractional belt area of approximately 11%. Our earlier FOS spectrum obtained 10 days after superoutburst reveals a cooler DAZQ white dwarf (20,500 ± 1000 K), relatively lower metal abundances, and a smaller fractional area (3%) for the accretion belt. Thus, 1 day after a normal outburst, the white dwarf is ≈2000 K hotter, the accretion belt fractional area is a factor of 3 greater, the accretion belt temperature appears to be cooler than at 10 days post-superoutburst, and the accreted atmosphere has relatively higher metal abundances. Finally, the accretion belt maintained during quiescence may provide a natural explanation for the 14 s soft X-ray oscillations, requires a deeper source of heating (compression and shear mixing), and implies a lower limit to the viscous spin-down timescale of 10 days.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume471
Issue number1 PART II
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

outburst
accretion
cooling
faint objects
coolers
spectrographs
metal
metals
metal spinning
oscillation
compression
shear
continuums
heating
timescale
atmospheres
oscillations
atmosphere
x rays
temperature

Keywords

  • Novae, cataclysmic variables
  • Stars: Individual (vw hydri)
  • White dwarfs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

The cooling white dwarf in VW hydri after normal outburst and superoutburst : HST evidence of a sustained accretion belt. / Sion, Edward M.; Cheng, F. U Hua; Huang, Min; Hubeny, Ivan -; Szkody, Paula.

In: Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 471, No. 1 PART II, 1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "The cooling white dwarf in VW hydri after normal outburst and superoutburst: HST evidence of a sustained accretion belt",
abstract = "Hubble Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) observations of VW Hyi one day after the end of a normal dwarf nova outburst reveal a heated white dwarf with deep, broad Lyα, narrow metallic absorption features, and evidence of a hotter Keplerian-broadened component manifested in quiescence as a broad continuum hump. Our best reduced χ2 fit to the data reveals (1) a DAZQ white dwarf with Teff= 22,500 ± 500 K, log g = 8, and photospheric abundances C = 0.5 solar, N = 5.0 solar, O = 2.0 solar, Si = 0.2 solar, Fe = 0.5 solar, with all other metals being 0.3 solar, and (2) a rapidly spinning accretion belt with Vrot = 3350 km s-1, Tbelt = 26,000 ± 1000 K, log g = 6.0, and a fractional belt area of approximately 11{\%}. Our earlier FOS spectrum obtained 10 days after superoutburst reveals a cooler DAZQ white dwarf (20,500 ± 1000 K), relatively lower metal abundances, and a smaller fractional area (3{\%}) for the accretion belt. Thus, 1 day after a normal outburst, the white dwarf is ≈2000 K hotter, the accretion belt fractional area is a factor of 3 greater, the accretion belt temperature appears to be cooler than at 10 days post-superoutburst, and the accreted atmosphere has relatively higher metal abundances. Finally, the accretion belt maintained during quiescence may provide a natural explanation for the 14 s soft X-ray oscillations, requires a deeper source of heating (compression and shear mixing), and implies a lower limit to the viscous spin-down timescale of 10 days.",
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T1 - The cooling white dwarf in VW hydri after normal outburst and superoutburst

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AU - Sion, Edward M.

AU - Cheng, F. U Hua

AU - Huang, Min

AU - Hubeny, Ivan -

AU - Szkody, Paula

PY - 1996

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N2 - Hubble Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) observations of VW Hyi one day after the end of a normal dwarf nova outburst reveal a heated white dwarf with deep, broad Lyα, narrow metallic absorption features, and evidence of a hotter Keplerian-broadened component manifested in quiescence as a broad continuum hump. Our best reduced χ2 fit to the data reveals (1) a DAZQ white dwarf with Teff= 22,500 ± 500 K, log g = 8, and photospheric abundances C = 0.5 solar, N = 5.0 solar, O = 2.0 solar, Si = 0.2 solar, Fe = 0.5 solar, with all other metals being 0.3 solar, and (2) a rapidly spinning accretion belt with Vrot = 3350 km s-1, Tbelt = 26,000 ± 1000 K, log g = 6.0, and a fractional belt area of approximately 11%. Our earlier FOS spectrum obtained 10 days after superoutburst reveals a cooler DAZQ white dwarf (20,500 ± 1000 K), relatively lower metal abundances, and a smaller fractional area (3%) for the accretion belt. Thus, 1 day after a normal outburst, the white dwarf is ≈2000 K hotter, the accretion belt fractional area is a factor of 3 greater, the accretion belt temperature appears to be cooler than at 10 days post-superoutburst, and the accreted atmosphere has relatively higher metal abundances. Finally, the accretion belt maintained during quiescence may provide a natural explanation for the 14 s soft X-ray oscillations, requires a deeper source of heating (compression and shear mixing), and implies a lower limit to the viscous spin-down timescale of 10 days.

AB - Hubble Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) observations of VW Hyi one day after the end of a normal dwarf nova outburst reveal a heated white dwarf with deep, broad Lyα, narrow metallic absorption features, and evidence of a hotter Keplerian-broadened component manifested in quiescence as a broad continuum hump. Our best reduced χ2 fit to the data reveals (1) a DAZQ white dwarf with Teff= 22,500 ± 500 K, log g = 8, and photospheric abundances C = 0.5 solar, N = 5.0 solar, O = 2.0 solar, Si = 0.2 solar, Fe = 0.5 solar, with all other metals being 0.3 solar, and (2) a rapidly spinning accretion belt with Vrot = 3350 km s-1, Tbelt = 26,000 ± 1000 K, log g = 6.0, and a fractional belt area of approximately 11%. Our earlier FOS spectrum obtained 10 days after superoutburst reveals a cooler DAZQ white dwarf (20,500 ± 1000 K), relatively lower metal abundances, and a smaller fractional area (3%) for the accretion belt. Thus, 1 day after a normal outburst, the white dwarf is ≈2000 K hotter, the accretion belt fractional area is a factor of 3 greater, the accretion belt temperature appears to be cooler than at 10 days post-superoutburst, and the accreted atmosphere has relatively higher metal abundances. Finally, the accretion belt maintained during quiescence may provide a natural explanation for the 14 s soft X-ray oscillations, requires a deeper source of heating (compression and shear mixing), and implies a lower limit to the viscous spin-down timescale of 10 days.

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