The earliest human occupation of the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau 40 thousand to 30 thousand years ago

X. L. Zhang, B. B. Ha, S. J. Wang, Z. J. Chen, J. Y. Ge, H. Long, W. He, W. Da, X. M. Nian, M. J. Yi, X. Y. Zhou, P. Q. Zhang, Y. S. Jin, O. Bar-Yosef, John W Olsen, X. Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Tibetan Plateau is the highest and one of the most demanding environments ever inhabited by humans. We investigated the timing and mechanisms of its initial colonization at the Nwya Devu site, located nearly 4600 meters above sea level. This site, dating from 40,000 to 30,000 years ago, is the highest Paleolithic archaeological site yet identified globally. Nwya Devu has yielded an abundant blade tool assemblage, indicating hitherto-unknown capacities for the survival of modern humans who camped in this environment. This site deepens the history of the peopling of the “roof of the world” and the antiquity of human high-altitude occupations more generally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1049-1051
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume362
Issue number6418
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 2018

Fingerprint

Occupations
Oceans and Seas
History
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Zhang, X. L., Ha, B. B., Wang, S. J., Chen, Z. J., Ge, J. Y., Long, H., ... Gao, X. (2018). The earliest human occupation of the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau 40 thousand to 30 thousand years ago. Science, 362(6418), 1049-1051. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aat8824

The earliest human occupation of the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau 40 thousand to 30 thousand years ago. / Zhang, X. L.; Ha, B. B.; Wang, S. J.; Chen, Z. J.; Ge, J. Y.; Long, H.; He, W.; Da, W.; Nian, X. M.; Yi, M. J.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhang, P. Q.; Jin, Y. S.; Bar-Yosef, O.; Olsen, John W; Gao, X.

In: Science, Vol. 362, No. 6418, 30.11.2018, p. 1049-1051.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, XL, Ha, BB, Wang, SJ, Chen, ZJ, Ge, JY, Long, H, He, W, Da, W, Nian, XM, Yi, MJ, Zhou, XY, Zhang, PQ, Jin, YS, Bar-Yosef, O, Olsen, JW & Gao, X 2018, 'The earliest human occupation of the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau 40 thousand to 30 thousand years ago', Science, vol. 362, no. 6418, pp. 1049-1051. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aat8824
Zhang, X. L. ; Ha, B. B. ; Wang, S. J. ; Chen, Z. J. ; Ge, J. Y. ; Long, H. ; He, W. ; Da, W. ; Nian, X. M. ; Yi, M. J. ; Zhou, X. Y. ; Zhang, P. Q. ; Jin, Y. S. ; Bar-Yosef, O. ; Olsen, John W ; Gao, X. / The earliest human occupation of the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau 40 thousand to 30 thousand years ago. In: Science. 2018 ; Vol. 362, No. 6418. pp. 1049-1051.
@article{ec07fe5303ac48adbccd365962606033,
title = "The earliest human occupation of the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau 40 thousand to 30 thousand years ago",
abstract = "The Tibetan Plateau is the highest and one of the most demanding environments ever inhabited by humans. We investigated the timing and mechanisms of its initial colonization at the Nwya Devu site, located nearly 4600 meters above sea level. This site, dating from 40,000 to 30,000 years ago, is the highest Paleolithic archaeological site yet identified globally. Nwya Devu has yielded an abundant blade tool assemblage, indicating hitherto-unknown capacities for the survival of modern humans who camped in this environment. This site deepens the history of the peopling of the “roof of the world” and the antiquity of human high-altitude occupations more generally.",
author = "Zhang, {X. L.} and Ha, {B. B.} and Wang, {S. J.} and Chen, {Z. J.} and Ge, {J. Y.} and H. Long and W. He and W. Da and Nian, {X. M.} and Yi, {M. J.} and Zhou, {X. Y.} and Zhang, {P. Q.} and Jin, {Y. S.} and O. Bar-Yosef and Olsen, {John W} and X. Gao",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1126/science.aat8824",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "362",
pages = "1049--1051",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "6418",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The earliest human occupation of the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau 40 thousand to 30 thousand years ago

AU - Zhang, X. L.

AU - Ha, B. B.

AU - Wang, S. J.

AU - Chen, Z. J.

AU - Ge, J. Y.

AU - Long, H.

AU - He, W.

AU - Da, W.

AU - Nian, X. M.

AU - Yi, M. J.

AU - Zhou, X. Y.

AU - Zhang, P. Q.

AU - Jin, Y. S.

AU - Bar-Yosef, O.

AU - Olsen, John W

AU - Gao, X.

PY - 2018/11/30

Y1 - 2018/11/30

N2 - The Tibetan Plateau is the highest and one of the most demanding environments ever inhabited by humans. We investigated the timing and mechanisms of its initial colonization at the Nwya Devu site, located nearly 4600 meters above sea level. This site, dating from 40,000 to 30,000 years ago, is the highest Paleolithic archaeological site yet identified globally. Nwya Devu has yielded an abundant blade tool assemblage, indicating hitherto-unknown capacities for the survival of modern humans who camped in this environment. This site deepens the history of the peopling of the “roof of the world” and the antiquity of human high-altitude occupations more generally.

AB - The Tibetan Plateau is the highest and one of the most demanding environments ever inhabited by humans. We investigated the timing and mechanisms of its initial colonization at the Nwya Devu site, located nearly 4600 meters above sea level. This site, dating from 40,000 to 30,000 years ago, is the highest Paleolithic archaeological site yet identified globally. Nwya Devu has yielded an abundant blade tool assemblage, indicating hitherto-unknown capacities for the survival of modern humans who camped in this environment. This site deepens the history of the peopling of the “roof of the world” and the antiquity of human high-altitude occupations more generally.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057567994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85057567994&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.aat8824

DO - 10.1126/science.aat8824

M3 - Article

C2 - 30498126

AN - SCOPUS:85057567994

VL - 362

SP - 1049

EP - 1051

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 6418

ER -