The ecology of empire: The dynamics of strategic differentiation-integration in two competing Western European biocultural groups

Aurelio José Figueredo, Mateo Peñaherrera-Aguirre, Heitor Barcellos Ferreira Fernandes, Sara Lindsey Lomayesva, Michael Anthony Woodley Of Menie, Steven Charles Hertler, Matthew Alexandar Sarraf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We tracked the relative integration and differentiation among life history traits over the period spanning AD 1800-1999 in the Britannic and Gallic biocultural groups. We found that Britannic populations tended toward greater strategic differentiation, while Gallic populations tended toward greater strategic integration. The dynamics of between-group competition between these two erstwhile rival biocultural groups were hypothesized as driving these processes. We constructed a latent factor that specifically sought to measure between-group competition and residualized it for the logarithmic effects of time. We found a significantly asymmetrical impact of between-group competition, where the between-group competition factor appeared to be driving the diachronic integration in Gallic populations but had no significantly corresponding influence on the parallel process of diachronic differentiation in Britannic populations. This suggests that the latter process was attributable to some alternative and unmeasured causes, such as the resource abundance consequent to territorial expansion rather than contraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-225
Number of pages16
JournalPolitics and the Life Sciences
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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ecology
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cause
resources

Keywords

  • Between-group competition
  • Lexicographic methods
  • Life history strategy
  • Limiting similarity theory
  • Social biogeography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Figueredo, A. J., Peñaherrera-Aguirre, M., Fernandes, H. B. F., Lomayesva, S. L., Woodley Of Menie, M. A., Hertler, S. C., & Sarraf, M. A. (2019). The ecology of empire: The dynamics of strategic differentiation-integration in two competing Western European biocultural groups. Politics and the Life Sciences, 38(2), 210-225. https://doi.org/10.1017/pls.2019.12

The ecology of empire : The dynamics of strategic differentiation-integration in two competing Western European biocultural groups. / Figueredo, Aurelio José; Peñaherrera-Aguirre, Mateo; Fernandes, Heitor Barcellos Ferreira; Lomayesva, Sara Lindsey; Woodley Of Menie, Michael Anthony; Hertler, Steven Charles; Sarraf, Matthew Alexandar.

In: Politics and the Life Sciences, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 210-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Figueredo, AJ, Peñaherrera-Aguirre, M, Fernandes, HBF, Lomayesva, SL, Woodley Of Menie, MA, Hertler, SC & Sarraf, MA 2019, 'The ecology of empire: The dynamics of strategic differentiation-integration in two competing Western European biocultural groups', Politics and the Life Sciences, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 210-225. https://doi.org/10.1017/pls.2019.12
Figueredo, Aurelio José ; Peñaherrera-Aguirre, Mateo ; Fernandes, Heitor Barcellos Ferreira ; Lomayesva, Sara Lindsey ; Woodley Of Menie, Michael Anthony ; Hertler, Steven Charles ; Sarraf, Matthew Alexandar. / The ecology of empire : The dynamics of strategic differentiation-integration in two competing Western European biocultural groups. In: Politics and the Life Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 210-225.
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