The economic impact of chronic prostatitis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Backgrounds: Little information exists on the economic impact of chronic prostatitis. The objective of this study was to determine the direct and indirect costs associated with chronic prostatitis. Methods: Outcomes were assessed using a questionnaire designed to capture health care resource utilization. Resource estimates were converted into unit costs with direct medical cost estimates based on hospital cost-accounting data and indirect costs based on modified labor force, employment, and earnings data from the US Census Bureau. Results: The total direct costs for the 3 months prior to entry into the cohort, excluding hospitalization, were $126915 for the 167 study participants for an average of $954 per person among the 133 consumers. Of the men, 26% reported work loss valued at an average of $551. The average total costs (direct and indirect) for the 3 months was $1099 per person for those 137 men who had resource consumption with an expected annual total cost per person of $4397. For those study participants with any incurred costs, tests for association revealed that the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (P<.001) and each of the 3 subcategories of pain (P=.003), urinary function (P=.03), and quality-of-life (P=.002) were significantly associated with resource use, although the quality-of-life subscale score from the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index was the only predictor of resource consumption. Conclusions: Chronic prostatitis is associated with substantial costs and lower quality-of-life scores, which predicted resource consumption. The economic impact of chronic prostatitis warrants increased medical attention and resources to identify and test effective treatment strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1231-1236
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume164
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 14 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Prostatitis
Economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Quality of Life
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Hospital Costs
Health Resources
Censuses
Hospitalization
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

The economic impact of chronic prostatitis. / Calhoun, Elizabeth.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 164, No. 11, 14.06.2004, p. 1231-1236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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