The effect of autoxidation on the methanogenic toxicity and anaerobic biodegradability of pyrogallol

James A Field, S. Kortekaas, G. Lettinga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a previous study, catechin (a condensed tannim monomer) was polymerized by autoxidation treatments. The resulting oligomeric tannins were responsible for the methanogenic toxicity observed in the autoxidized catechin solutions (Field, J. A., Kortekaas, S. & Lettinga, G. (1989). The tannin theory of methanogenic toxicity. Biol. Wastes 29(4) 241-62). In this study the autoxidation of pyrogallol (a hydrolyzable tanning monomer) did not cause extensive polymerization. Initially, some polymerization occurred, producing toxic intermediates that were later destroyed by a destructive type of oxidation caused by prolonged autoxidation treatments. The first intermediate formed, purpurogallin (a dimer), caused a high level of toxicity to both the methanogenic activity and to the anaerobic degradation of pyrogallol. Since purpurogallin is a highly toxic autoxidation product that lacks tannic features, the changes in methanogenic toxicity induced by the autoxidation of pyrogallol cannot be estimated by changes in the oligomeric tannin concentration. Regardless of the reactions that take place during the autoxidation of tannin monomeric derivatives, the initial reactions can potentially lead to colored products of increased methanogenic toxicity. These are later detoxified by prolonged autoxidation, either by polymerization to high MW compounds (with condensed tannin model compounds), or by destruction of the initially toxic intermediates to low MW compounds (with hydrolyzable tannin model compounds).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-121
Number of pages11
JournalBiological Wastes
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pyrogallol
Tannins
Biodegradability
tannin
Toxicity
Poisons
toxicity
polymerization
Catechin
Polymerization
Monomers
Hydrolyzable Tannins
Tanning
Proanthocyanidins
Dimers
effect
biodegradability
Derivatives
Degradation
Oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Cite this

The effect of autoxidation on the methanogenic toxicity and anaerobic biodegradability of pyrogallol. / Field, James A; Kortekaas, S.; Lettinga, G.

In: Biological Wastes, Vol. 30, No. 2, 1989, p. 111-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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