The Effect of Daily Use of Plantar Mechanical Stimulation Through Micro-Mobile Foot Compression Device Installed in Shoe Insoles on Vibration Perception, Gait, and Balance in People With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Gu Eon Kang, Mohsen Zahiri, Brian Lepow, Nimrah Saleem, Bijan Najafi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: People with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) have impaired gait and balance performance. The aim of this study is to investigate therapeutic effectiveness of mechanical stimulation through a wearable foot compression device equipped in a shoe insole on vibration perception, balance control and gait performance in people with DPN. Methods: Using a single-arm 4-week intervention study design, we examined effectiveness of daily use of shoes equipped with the foot compression device (Footbeat™, AVEX, Grand Junction, CO, USA) on improving vibration perception threshold (VPT max ), skin perfusion pressure (SPP), ankle brachial index (ABI), lower extremities edema (circumferences in the calf and ankle), and motor performance (postural sway with eyes open and closed conditions, and gait performance during normal, dual-task and fast walking). Thirty people with type 2 diabetes and symptoms of PN completed the experimental protocol. Results: Improvements in VPT max (before = 27.4 V, after = 23.3 V, P =.007, d = 0.33, where d denotes effect size), center-of-mass sway in the mediolateral direction with both eyes open and closed conditions (before = 0.94 cm, after = 0.76 cm, P =.020, d = 0.47; before = 1.10 cm, after = 0.83 cm, P =.033, d = 0.66, respectively), and stride velocity for normal walking, dual-task walking and fast walking tasks (before = 0.87 m/s, after = 0.96 m/s, P =.017, d = 0.41; before = 0.75 m/s, after = 0.91 m/s, P =.001, d = 0.77; before = 1.10 m/s, after = 1.20 m/s, P =.043, d = 0.33, respectively) were found post treatment. There was no significant improvement in SPP, ABI, and circumferences in the calf and ankle. Conclusions: Our findings suggest the wearable foot compression device may be effective for reducing neuropathic symptoms and enhancing motor performances in people with DPN.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Diabetes Science and Technology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Shoes
Diabetic Neuropathies
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Vibration
Gait
Walking
Foot
Skin
Ankle Brachial Index
Equipment and Supplies
Carbon Monoxide
Medical problems
Ankle
Perfusion
Pressure
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Lower Extremity
Edema
Direction compound
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • balance
  • diabetes
  • diabetic peripheral neuropathy
  • gait
  • vibration perception threshold

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

@article{2bc0256b6a1f4a89b45cf0aa35cc763a,
title = "The Effect of Daily Use of Plantar Mechanical Stimulation Through Micro-Mobile Foot Compression Device Installed in Shoe Insoles on Vibration Perception, Gait, and Balance in People With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy",
abstract = "Objective: People with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) have impaired gait and balance performance. The aim of this study is to investigate therapeutic effectiveness of mechanical stimulation through a wearable foot compression device equipped in a shoe insole on vibration perception, balance control and gait performance in people with DPN. Methods: Using a single-arm 4-week intervention study design, we examined effectiveness of daily use of shoes equipped with the foot compression device (Footbeat™, AVEX, Grand Junction, CO, USA) on improving vibration perception threshold (VPT max ), skin perfusion pressure (SPP), ankle brachial index (ABI), lower extremities edema (circumferences in the calf and ankle), and motor performance (postural sway with eyes open and closed conditions, and gait performance during normal, dual-task and fast walking). Thirty people with type 2 diabetes and symptoms of PN completed the experimental protocol. Results: Improvements in VPT max (before = 27.4 V, after = 23.3 V, P =.007, d = 0.33, where d denotes effect size), center-of-mass sway in the mediolateral direction with both eyes open and closed conditions (before = 0.94 cm, after = 0.76 cm, P =.020, d = 0.47; before = 1.10 cm, after = 0.83 cm, P =.033, d = 0.66, respectively), and stride velocity for normal walking, dual-task walking and fast walking tasks (before = 0.87 m/s, after = 0.96 m/s, P =.017, d = 0.41; before = 0.75 m/s, after = 0.91 m/s, P =.001, d = 0.77; before = 1.10 m/s, after = 1.20 m/s, P =.043, d = 0.33, respectively) were found post treatment. There was no significant improvement in SPP, ABI, and circumferences in the calf and ankle. Conclusions: Our findings suggest the wearable foot compression device may be effective for reducing neuropathic symptoms and enhancing motor performances in people with DPN.",
keywords = "balance, diabetes, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, gait, vibration perception threshold",
author = "Kang, {Gu Eon} and Mohsen Zahiri and Brian Lepow and Nimrah Saleem and Bijan Najafi",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1932296819839703",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of diabetes science and technology",
issn = "1932-2968",
publisher = "Diabetes Technology Society",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of Daily Use of Plantar Mechanical Stimulation Through Micro-Mobile Foot Compression Device Installed in Shoe Insoles on Vibration Perception, Gait, and Balance in People With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

AU - Kang, Gu Eon

AU - Zahiri, Mohsen

AU - Lepow, Brian

AU - Saleem, Nimrah

AU - Najafi, Bijan

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: People with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) have impaired gait and balance performance. The aim of this study is to investigate therapeutic effectiveness of mechanical stimulation through a wearable foot compression device equipped in a shoe insole on vibration perception, balance control and gait performance in people with DPN. Methods: Using a single-arm 4-week intervention study design, we examined effectiveness of daily use of shoes equipped with the foot compression device (Footbeat™, AVEX, Grand Junction, CO, USA) on improving vibration perception threshold (VPT max ), skin perfusion pressure (SPP), ankle brachial index (ABI), lower extremities edema (circumferences in the calf and ankle), and motor performance (postural sway with eyes open and closed conditions, and gait performance during normal, dual-task and fast walking). Thirty people with type 2 diabetes and symptoms of PN completed the experimental protocol. Results: Improvements in VPT max (before = 27.4 V, after = 23.3 V, P =.007, d = 0.33, where d denotes effect size), center-of-mass sway in the mediolateral direction with both eyes open and closed conditions (before = 0.94 cm, after = 0.76 cm, P =.020, d = 0.47; before = 1.10 cm, after = 0.83 cm, P =.033, d = 0.66, respectively), and stride velocity for normal walking, dual-task walking and fast walking tasks (before = 0.87 m/s, after = 0.96 m/s, P =.017, d = 0.41; before = 0.75 m/s, after = 0.91 m/s, P =.001, d = 0.77; before = 1.10 m/s, after = 1.20 m/s, P =.043, d = 0.33, respectively) were found post treatment. There was no significant improvement in SPP, ABI, and circumferences in the calf and ankle. Conclusions: Our findings suggest the wearable foot compression device may be effective for reducing neuropathic symptoms and enhancing motor performances in people with DPN.

AB - Objective: People with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) have impaired gait and balance performance. The aim of this study is to investigate therapeutic effectiveness of mechanical stimulation through a wearable foot compression device equipped in a shoe insole on vibration perception, balance control and gait performance in people with DPN. Methods: Using a single-arm 4-week intervention study design, we examined effectiveness of daily use of shoes equipped with the foot compression device (Footbeat™, AVEX, Grand Junction, CO, USA) on improving vibration perception threshold (VPT max ), skin perfusion pressure (SPP), ankle brachial index (ABI), lower extremities edema (circumferences in the calf and ankle), and motor performance (postural sway with eyes open and closed conditions, and gait performance during normal, dual-task and fast walking). Thirty people with type 2 diabetes and symptoms of PN completed the experimental protocol. Results: Improvements in VPT max (before = 27.4 V, after = 23.3 V, P =.007, d = 0.33, where d denotes effect size), center-of-mass sway in the mediolateral direction with both eyes open and closed conditions (before = 0.94 cm, after = 0.76 cm, P =.020, d = 0.47; before = 1.10 cm, after = 0.83 cm, P =.033, d = 0.66, respectively), and stride velocity for normal walking, dual-task walking and fast walking tasks (before = 0.87 m/s, after = 0.96 m/s, P =.017, d = 0.41; before = 0.75 m/s, after = 0.91 m/s, P =.001, d = 0.77; before = 1.10 m/s, after = 1.20 m/s, P =.043, d = 0.33, respectively) were found post treatment. There was no significant improvement in SPP, ABI, and circumferences in the calf and ankle. Conclusions: Our findings suggest the wearable foot compression device may be effective for reducing neuropathic symptoms and enhancing motor performances in people with DPN.

KW - balance

KW - diabetes

KW - diabetic peripheral neuropathy

KW - gait

KW - vibration perception threshold

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