The effect of dilution on plasma coagulation kinetics determined by thrombelastography is dependent on antithrombin activity and mode of activation

Vance G. Nielsen, Ralph T. Lyerly, William Q. Gurley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hemodilution-associated hypercoagulability has been the focus of several investigations because significant morbidity and mortality have been associated with perioperative thrombophilia. Because most investigations implicate imbalances in procoagulant/anticoagulant activity as the etiology of hemodilution-associated hypercoagulability, we determined the effects of dilution on coagulation kinetics and clot strength with thrombelastography (TEG®). Control plasma (± celite activation) and antithrombin (AT)-deficient (<10% activity) plasma were diluted 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% with saline. TEG® variables measured included time to clot initiation (reaction time, R), speed of clot propagation (angle, α), and clot strength (amplitude, A; or shear elastic modulus, G). Dilution of control plasma (10%-30%) resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) 16% decrease in R values, no change in α values, and decrease in A and G values. AT-deficient plasma had significantly smaller R values compared with control, and dilution did not change R values in AT-deficient plasma. Celite activation eliminated dilution-associated changes in R values in control plasma but resulted in linear decreases (R2 = 0.88-0.96, P < 0.0001) in α, A, and G in response to dilution. Thus, our data indirectly support the concept that decreases in AT activity cause dilution-mediated hypercoagulability in plasma. Finally, celite activation permits quantification of dilution with TEG®.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1587-1592
Number of pages6
JournalAnesthesia and analgesia
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of dilution on plasma coagulation kinetics determined by thrombelastography is dependent on antithrombin activity and mode of activation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this