The effect of gamma keratose on cell viability invitro after thermal stress and the regulation of cell death pathway-specific gene expression

Deepika R. Poranki, Mark E. Van Dyke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

When skin is thermally burned, transfer of heat energy into the skin results in the destruction of cells. Some of these cells are damaged but may be capable of self-repair and survival, thereby contributing to spontaneous healing of the wound. Keratin protein-based biomaterials have been suggested as potential treatments for burn injury. Isolation of cortical proteins from hair fibers results in an acid soluble fraction of keratin proteins referred to as "gamma" keratose. In the present study, treatment with this fraction dissolved in media was able to maintain cell viability after thermal stress in an invitro model using primary mouse dermal fibroblasts. PCR array analysis demonstrated that gamma keratose treatment may assist in the survival and salvage of thermally stressed cells by maintaining their viability through regulation of cell death pathway-related genes. Gamma keratose may be a promising biomaterial for burn treatment that aids in spontaneous wound healing from viable tissue surrounding the burn.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4646-4655
Number of pages10
JournalBiomaterials
Volume35
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Autophagy
  • Burn
  • Keratin
  • Skin
  • Thermal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of gamma keratose on cell viability invitro after thermal stress and the regulation of cell death pathway-specific gene expression'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this