The effect of vibratory stimulation on the timed-up-and-go mobility test: A pilot study for sensory-related fall risk assessment

Nima Toosizadeh, Genevieve Wahlert, Mindy Fain, Jane Mohler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Effects of localized lower-extremity vibration on postural balance have been reported. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of low-frequency vibration of calf muscles on the instrumented Timed-Up-and-Go (iTUG) test among older adults. Older adults were recruited and classified to low (n=10, age=72.9±2.8 years) and high fall risk (n=10, age=83.6±9.6) using STEADI. Vibratory system (30Hz or 40Hz), was positioned on calves along with wearable motion sensors. Participants performed the iTUG test three times, under conditions of no-vibration, 30Hz, and 40Hz vibration. Percentage differences in duration of iTUG components were calculated comparing vibration vs no-vibration conditions. Significant between-group differences were observed in iTUG (p=0.03); high fall risk participants showed reduction in the duration of turning (-10 % with 30Hz; p=0.15 and -15 % with 40Hz; p=0.03) and turning and sitting (-18 % with 30Hz; p=0.02 and -10 % with 40Hz; p=0.08). However, vibration increased turning (+18 % with 30Hz; p=0.20 and +27 % with 40Hz; p=0.12) and turning and sitting duration (+27 % with 30Hz; p=0.11 and +47 % with 40Hz; p=0.12) in low fall risk participants. Findings suggest that lower-extremity vibration affects dynamic balance; however, the level of this influence may differ between low and high fall risk older adults, which can potentially be used for assessing agingrelated sensory deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)721-730
Number of pages10
JournalPhysiological Research
Volume69
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Dynamic balance
  • Fall risk
  • Older adults
  • Proprioceptive
  • Vibration stimulation
  • Wearable sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of vibratory stimulation on the timed-up-and-go mobility test: A pilot study for sensory-related fall risk assessment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this