The effects of personality and media differences on the performance of dyads addressing a cognitive conflict task

Heikki Topi, Joseph S. Valacich, Madhu T. Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior information systems research has found that numerous contextual factors, including individual differences, can influence which communication technologies are chosen for various situations. Because the adaptability of information and communication technologies to individual preferences and different environments is continuously improving, it has become increasingly feasible and important to investigate the relationships between individual characteristics (such as personality) and features of technology. In this study, the communication environment (face to face vs. synchronous computer mediated) and partners' personality types (extraversion-introversion) in two-person groups were contrasted in a laboratory experiment. Dyads addressed a cognitive conflict task - allocation of limited funds to controversial social causes. Contrary to the hypotheses, introverts exerted influence over extraverts. As expected, extraverts were more satisfied with the process than introverts, and face-to-face dyads required less time, were more satisfied, and perceived less conflict than computer-mediated dyads. Given the ease with which some modern technologies can be melded to each individual's preferences and that prior research has shown that individual differences influence the selection of technologies, these results have important implications for future information systems researchers and technology designers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-701
Number of pages35
JournalSmall Group Research
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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