The effects of sex in television drama shows on emerging adults' sexual attitudes and moral judgments

Keren Eyal, Dale L Kunkel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tests the effects of exposure to sexual television content on emerging adults' sexual attitudes and moral judgments. One hundred and ten college freshmen were randomly assigned to view shows that portrayed either positive or negative consequences of sexual intercourse. Results indicate that exposure to shows that portray negative consequences of sex leads to more negative attitudes toward premarital intercourse and to more negative moral judgments of characters engaged in this behavior. Results were observed immediately after the viewing and persisted 2 weeks later. Findings are discussed in light of social cognitive theory and previous media effects research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-181
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

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moral judgement
Television
drama
television
cognitive theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

The effects of sex in television drama shows on emerging adults' sexual attitudes and moral judgments. / Eyal, Keren; Kunkel, Dale L.

In: Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Vol. 52, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 161-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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