The emergency physician and patient confidentiality

A review

Gregory L. Larkin, John Moskop, Arthur B Sanders, Arthur Derse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Confidentiality is a promise rooted in tradition, law andmedical ethics. Emergency physicians treat a variety of patients to whom confidentiality is of vital importance: employees, celebrities, victims of violence or disaster, minors, students, criminals, drug abusers, and patients with STDs. EDs should develop methods of ensuring confidentiality for all patients.34. Although confidentiality is an important principle thatshould be respected and guarded, it is not absolute. Various laws mandate disclosure of certain patient information; in addition, an overriding moral duty may occasionally require, a breach of confidentiality. As Beauchamp and Childress noted, "the therapeutic role may sometimes have to yield to ones role as citizen and as protector of the interests of others".19 In general, however, circumstances requiring a breach of confidentiality are rare.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1161-1167
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Confidentiality
Emergencies
Physicians
Moral Obligations
Minors
Disclosure
Disasters
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Drug Users
Violence
Ethics
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

The emergency physician and patient confidentiality : A review. / Larkin, Gregory L.; Moskop, John; Sanders, Arthur B; Derse, Arthur.

In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 6, 1994, p. 1161-1167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Larkin, Gregory L. ; Moskop, John ; Sanders, Arthur B ; Derse, Arthur. / The emergency physician and patient confidentiality : A review. In: Annals of Emergency Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 1161-1167.
@article{9dfccf46f6cf47dbb755d57b770217f5,
title = "The emergency physician and patient confidentiality: A review",
abstract = "Confidentiality is a promise rooted in tradition, law andmedical ethics. Emergency physicians treat a variety of patients to whom confidentiality is of vital importance: employees, celebrities, victims of violence or disaster, minors, students, criminals, drug abusers, and patients with STDs. EDs should develop methods of ensuring confidentiality for all patients.34. Although confidentiality is an important principle thatshould be respected and guarded, it is not absolute. Various laws mandate disclosure of certain patient information; in addition, an overriding moral duty may occasionally require, a breach of confidentiality. As Beauchamp and Childress noted, {"}the therapeutic role may sometimes have to yield to ones role as citizen and as protector of the interests of others{"}.19 In general, however, circumstances requiring a breach of confidentiality are rare.",
author = "Larkin, {Gregory L.} and John Moskop and Sanders, {Arthur B} and Arthur Derse",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1016/S0196-0644(94)70249-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "1161--1167",
journal = "Annals of Emergency Medicine",
issn = "0196-0644",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The emergency physician and patient confidentiality

T2 - A review

AU - Larkin, Gregory L.

AU - Moskop, John

AU - Sanders, Arthur B

AU - Derse, Arthur

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Confidentiality is a promise rooted in tradition, law andmedical ethics. Emergency physicians treat a variety of patients to whom confidentiality is of vital importance: employees, celebrities, victims of violence or disaster, minors, students, criminals, drug abusers, and patients with STDs. EDs should develop methods of ensuring confidentiality for all patients.34. Although confidentiality is an important principle thatshould be respected and guarded, it is not absolute. Various laws mandate disclosure of certain patient information; in addition, an overriding moral duty may occasionally require, a breach of confidentiality. As Beauchamp and Childress noted, "the therapeutic role may sometimes have to yield to ones role as citizen and as protector of the interests of others".19 In general, however, circumstances requiring a breach of confidentiality are rare.

AB - Confidentiality is a promise rooted in tradition, law andmedical ethics. Emergency physicians treat a variety of patients to whom confidentiality is of vital importance: employees, celebrities, victims of violence or disaster, minors, students, criminals, drug abusers, and patients with STDs. EDs should develop methods of ensuring confidentiality for all patients.34. Although confidentiality is an important principle thatshould be respected and guarded, it is not absolute. Various laws mandate disclosure of certain patient information; in addition, an overriding moral duty may occasionally require, a breach of confidentiality. As Beauchamp and Childress noted, "the therapeutic role may sometimes have to yield to ones role as citizen and as protector of the interests of others".19 In general, however, circumstances requiring a breach of confidentiality are rare.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028075684&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028075684&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0196-0644(94)70249-7

DO - 10.1016/S0196-0644(94)70249-7

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 1161

EP - 1167

JO - Annals of Emergency Medicine

JF - Annals of Emergency Medicine

SN - 0196-0644

IS - 6

ER -