The Ethical Self-Fashioning of Physicians and Health Care Systems in Culturally Appropriate Health Care

Susan J. Shaw, Julie Armin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diverse advocacy groups have pushed for the recognition of cultural differences in health care as a means to redress inequalities in the U.S., elaborating a form of biocitizenship that draws on evidence of racial and ethnic health disparities to make claims on both the state and health care providers. These efforts led to federal regulations developed by the U.S. Office of Minority Health requiring health care organizations to provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services. Based on ethnographic research at workshops and conferences, in-depth interviews with cultural competence trainers, and an analysis of postings to a moderated listserv with 2,000 members, we explore cultural competence trainings as a new type of social technology in which health care providers and institutions are urged to engage in ethical self-fashioning to eliminate prejudice and embody the values of cultural relativism. Health care providers are called on to re-orient their practice (such as habits of gaze, touch, and decision-making) and to act on their own subjectivities to develop an orientation toward Others that isculturally competent. We explore the diverse methods that cultural competence trainings use to foster a health care provider's ability to be self-reflexive, including face-to-face workshops and classes and self-guided on-line modules. We argue that the hybrid formation of culturally appropriate health care is becoming detached from its social justice origins as it becomes rationalized by and more firmly embedded in the operations of the health care marketplace.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-261
Number of pages26
JournalCulture, Medicine and Psychiatry
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

Keywords

  • Cultural competence
  • Health disparities
  • Minority health
  • Physician training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Ethical Self-Fashioning of Physicians and Health Care Systems in Culturally Appropriate Health Care'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this