The extermination and conservation of the American bison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dramatic near extinction, and subsequent recovery and restoration, of the American bison during the late nineteenth century is examined using a property rights model of renewable resource production, The paper considers the implications of bison exploitation under open-access, common-ownership, and private-property regimes and further examines how these regimes are determined. Implications are tested against historical and anthropological data on bison populations, robe and hide prices, cattle-stocking rates, American military behavior, Indian tribal territories, federal land policy, the costs of harvesting bison, and formal and informal property rights regimes. The study uncovers the details of this famous story in American wildlife conservation and sheds light on the role of markets in extinction and preservation and the evolution of property rights to such large-scale natural resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Legal Studies
Volume31
Issue number2 II
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2002
Externally publishedYes

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right of ownership
conservation
renewable resources
land policy
private property
open access
restoration
exploitation
natural resources
nineteenth century
Military
regime
market
costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

Cite this

The extermination and conservation of the American bison. / Lueck, Dean L.

In: Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 31, No. 2 II, 06.2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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