The geography of urban commuting fields: some empirical evidence from New England.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cities have become increasingly interdependent. Yet we continue to think of the urban landscape in terms of mutually exclusive, monocentric regions. Data from New England suggest a richer, overlapping geography of metropolitan-area commuting fields. New ways of conceptualizing flow-based systems are needed to understand urban settlement patterns better. -Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)182-188
Number of pages7
JournalProfessional Geographer
Volume33
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1981

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settlement pattern
commuting
metropolitan area
agglomeration area
geography
evidence
urban settlement
city
urban landscape

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

The geography of urban commuting fields : some empirical evidence from New England. / Plane, David.

In: Professional Geographer, Vol. 33, No. 2, 1981, p. 182-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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