The global commodification of wastewater

Christopher A Scott, Liqa Raschid-Sally

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With growing scarcity and competition for water, urban wastewater is increasingly marketable because of its water and nutrient values. Commodification has implications for the current "residual" uses of wastewater (particularly by poor farmers in developing countries), for the risk of disease transmission, and for wastewater-dependent agro-ecosystems. Using examples from Pakistan, India, Ethiopia, Ghana, Mexico, and the United States, this paper contrasts commodification as it occurs in the developed and developing worlds and demonstrates the need for public information and coherent institutional frameworks, including private- and public-sector participation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-155
Number of pages9
JournalWater International
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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developing world
wastewater
disease transmission
institutional framework
public sector
private sector
water
nutrient
ecosystem
public information
need
urban wastewater
participation

Keywords

  • commodification
  • management
  • urban wastewater
  • value of wastewater

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

The global commodification of wastewater. / Scott, Christopher A; Raschid-Sally, Liqa.

In: Water International, Vol. 37, No. 2, 03.2012, p. 147-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott, Christopher A ; Raschid-Sally, Liqa. / The global commodification of wastewater. In: Water International. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 147-155.
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