The home literacy environment: Exploring how media and parent–child interactions are associated with children's language production

Kara G. Liebeskind, Jessica T. Piotrowski, Matthew A. Lapierre, Deborah L. Linebarger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children who start school with strong language skills initiate a trajectory of academic success, while children with weaker skills are likely to struggle. Research has demonstrated that media and parent–child interactions, both characteristics of the home literacy environment, influence children's language skills. Using a national sample of American parents of children aged 8–36 months (n = 500), the current study evaluated how media and parent–child interactions are associated with children's language skills. Results indicated a positive association between literacy-based parent–child interactions and children's language production. The association between access to radios and children's books was mediated by parent–child interactions. These results offer important implications for creating home interventions to boost the language abilities of children before entering school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)482-509
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Early Childhood Literacy
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 2014
Externally publishedYes

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literacy
interaction
language
academic success
school
radio
parents
ability

Keywords

  • children
  • home literacy environment
  • media
  • parent–child interactions language production

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

The home literacy environment : Exploring how media and parent–child interactions are associated with children's language production. / Liebeskind, Kara G.; Piotrowski, Jessica T.; Lapierre, Matthew A.; Linebarger, Deborah L.

In: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, Vol. 14, No. 4, 27.12.2014, p. 482-509.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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