The impact of American College of Surgeons trauma center designation and outcomes after early thoracotomy: A national trauma databank analysis

Marko Bukur, Bernardino Castelo Branco, Kenji Inaba, Ramon Cestero, Leslie Kobayashi, Andrew - Tang, Demetrios Demetriades

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trauma centers are designated by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) into four different levels based on resources, volume, and scientific and educational commitment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ACS center designation and outcomes after early thoracotomy for trauma. The National Trauma Databank (v. 7.0) was used to identify all patients who required early thoracotomy. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were extracted. Patients were categorized according to ACS trauma center designation. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of ACS trauma center designation on mortality. From 2002 to 2006, 1834 (77.4%) patients were admitted to a Level I ACS verified trauma center, 474 (20.0%) to a Level II, and 59 (3.6%) to a Level III/IV facility. After adjusting for differences between the groups, there were no significant differences in mortality (overall: 53.3% for Level I, 63.1% for Level II, and 52.5% for Level III/IV, adjusted P = 0.417; or for patients arriving in cardiac arrest: 74.9% vs 87.1% vs 85.0%, P = 0.261). Subgroup analysis did not show any significant difference in survival irrespective of mechanism of injury. Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8, Injury Severity Score > 16, no admission systolic blood pressure, time from admission to thoracotomy, and nonteaching hospitals were found to be independent predictors of death. For trauma patients who have sustained injuries requiring early thoracotomy, ACS trauma center designation did not significantly impact mortality. Nonteaching institutions however, were independently associated with poorer outcomes after early thoracotomy. These findings may have important implications in educational commitment of institutions. Further prospective evaluation of these findings is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-41
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume78
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Trauma Centers
Thoracotomy
Databases
Wounds and Injuries
Mortality
Blood Pressure
Glasgow Coma Scale
Injury Severity Score
Heart Arrest
Logistic Models
Demography
Surgeons
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

The impact of American College of Surgeons trauma center designation and outcomes after early thoracotomy : A national trauma databank analysis. / Bukur, Marko; Branco, Bernardino Castelo; Inaba, Kenji; Cestero, Ramon; Kobayashi, Leslie; Tang, Andrew -; Demetriades, Demetrios.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 78, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 36-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bukur, M, Branco, BC, Inaba, K, Cestero, R, Kobayashi, L, Tang, A & Demetriades, D 2012, 'The impact of American College of Surgeons trauma center designation and outcomes after early thoracotomy: A national trauma databank analysis', American Surgeon, vol. 78, no. 1, pp. 36-41.
Bukur, Marko ; Branco, Bernardino Castelo ; Inaba, Kenji ; Cestero, Ramon ; Kobayashi, Leslie ; Tang, Andrew - ; Demetriades, Demetrios. / The impact of American College of Surgeons trauma center designation and outcomes after early thoracotomy : A national trauma databank analysis. In: American Surgeon. 2012 ; Vol. 78, No. 1. pp. 36-41.
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