The impact of cochlear implantation on cognition in older adults: A systematic review of clinical evidence

Gina Miller, Craig Miller, Nicole Marrone, Carol Howe, Mindy Fain, Abraham Jacob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Hearing loss is the third most prevalent chronic condition faced by older adults and has been linked to difficulties in speech perception, activities of daily living, and social interaction. Recent studies have suggested a correlation between severity of hearing loss and an individual's cognitive function; however, a causative link has yet to be established. One intervention option for management of the most severe to profound hearing loss in older adults is cochlear implantation. We performed a review to determine the status of the literature on the potential influence of cochlear implantation on cognition in the older adult population. Methods: Over 3800 articles related to cochlear implants, cognition, and older adults were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study population including adults > 65 years, (2) intervention with cochlear implantation, and (3) cognition as the primary outcome measure of implantation. Results: Out of 3,886 studies selected, 3 met inclusion criteria for the review. Conclusions: While many publications have shown that cochlear implants improve speech perception, social functioning, and overall quality of life, we found no studies in the English literature that have prospectively evaluated changes in cognitive function after implantation with modern cochlear implants in older adults. The state of the current literature reveals a need for further clinical research on the impact of cochlear implantation on cognition in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number16
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Keywords

  • Cochlear implant
  • Cognition
  • Cognitive decline
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Elderly
  • Elderly people
  • Hearing impairment
  • Hearing loss
  • Older people

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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