The impact of concurrent linguistic tasks on participants’ identification of spearcons

Thomas Davidson, Youn Ji Ryu, Birgit Brecknell, Robert G Loeb, Penelope Sanderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Spearcons (time-compressed speech) may be a viable auditory display for patient monitoring; however, the impact of concurrent linguistic tasks remains unexamined. We tested whether different concurrent linguistic tasks worsen participants' identification of spearcons. Experiment 1 tested non-clinician participants' identification of multiple-patient spearcons representing 2 vital signs of 5 patients while participants performed no concurrent task, reading, or saying linguistic tasks. Experiment 2 tested non-clinician participants' identification of 48 single-patient spearcons while they performed no concurrent task, reading, listening, and saying linguistic tasks. In Experiment 1 the saying task worsened participants' identification of spearcons compared with no concurrent task or reading. In Experiment 2, the saying and listening tasks reduced participants' accuracy at identifying spearcons, but the reading task did not. Listening affected identification accuracy no differently than the saying task did. Concurrent auditory linguistic tasks worsen participants’ identification of spearcons, probably due to auditory modality interference in verbal working memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102895
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume81
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

Linguistics
Reading
linguistics
experiment
Experiments
Patient monitoring
Vital Signs
Physiologic Monitoring
Short-Term Memory
Display devices
Data storage equipment
interference
monitoring

Keywords

  • Auditory displays
  • Patient monitoring
  • Spearcons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The impact of concurrent linguistic tasks on participants’ identification of spearcons. / Davidson, Thomas; Ryu, Youn Ji; Brecknell, Birgit; Loeb, Robert G; Sanderson, Penelope.

In: Applied Ergonomics, Vol. 81, 102895, 01.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davidson, Thomas ; Ryu, Youn Ji ; Brecknell, Birgit ; Loeb, Robert G ; Sanderson, Penelope. / The impact of concurrent linguistic tasks on participants’ identification of spearcons. In: Applied Ergonomics. 2019 ; Vol. 81.
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