The impact of HIV-related interventions on HIV risk behavior in a community sample of African American crack cocaine users

M. W. Ross, S. C. Timpson, M. L. Williams, Anne Markey Bowen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While there are reports of the impact of specific interventions designed to reduce HIV drug and sexual risk behaviors, there are few reports of the impact of HIV interventions in a community-based sample. We report on baseline data from a sample of African American crack smokers who were about to participate in an intervention designed to reduce HIV-related risk behaviors. The majority were male (80%), single (70%) and homeless (52%). Data indicated that 29% of the sample had been in a previous HIV intervention in the past 12 months, the majority in a correctional setting or CBO program. There were few systematic demographic differences between the two groups. Those who had been in an intervention reported using male and female condoms significantly more frequently on all measures of condom use, had positive condom use outcome expectations for male condoms and higher affective and situational condom-related self-efficacy beliefs. These data suggest that, at a community level, the spectrum of HIV risk-reduction programs does produce a significant improvement in condom use and related cognitions, although there is a need to cover a greater proportion of the population. Previous exposure to interventions must be a critical covariate in assessing the impact of future interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)608-616
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Crack Cocaine
Condoms
Risk-Taking
risk behavior
African Americans
HIV
community
Female Condoms
Self Efficacy
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sexual Behavior
Cognition
Demography
American
self-efficacy
cognition
drug
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The impact of HIV-related interventions on HIV risk behavior in a community sample of African American crack cocaine users. / Ross, M. W.; Timpson, S. C.; Williams, M. L.; Bowen, Anne Markey.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 19, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 608-616.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4b84e0c008da4ecfa392346370835c4f,
title = "The impact of HIV-related interventions on HIV risk behavior in a community sample of African American crack cocaine users",
abstract = "While there are reports of the impact of specific interventions designed to reduce HIV drug and sexual risk behaviors, there are few reports of the impact of HIV interventions in a community-based sample. We report on baseline data from a sample of African American crack smokers who were about to participate in an intervention designed to reduce HIV-related risk behaviors. The majority were male (80{\%}), single (70{\%}) and homeless (52{\%}). Data indicated that 29{\%} of the sample had been in a previous HIV intervention in the past 12 months, the majority in a correctional setting or CBO program. There were few systematic demographic differences between the two groups. Those who had been in an intervention reported using male and female condoms significantly more frequently on all measures of condom use, had positive condom use outcome expectations for male condoms and higher affective and situational condom-related self-efficacy beliefs. These data suggest that, at a community level, the spectrum of HIV risk-reduction programs does produce a significant improvement in condom use and related cognitions, although there is a need to cover a greater proportion of the population. Previous exposure to interventions must be a critical covariate in assessing the impact of future interventions.",
author = "Ross, {M. W.} and Timpson, {S. C.} and Williams, {M. L.} and Bowen, {Anne Markey}",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1080/09540120600983989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "608--616",
journal = "AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV",
issn = "0954-0121",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of HIV-related interventions on HIV risk behavior in a community sample of African American crack cocaine users

AU - Ross, M. W.

AU - Timpson, S. C.

AU - Williams, M. L.

AU - Bowen, Anne Markey

PY - 2007/5

Y1 - 2007/5

N2 - While there are reports of the impact of specific interventions designed to reduce HIV drug and sexual risk behaviors, there are few reports of the impact of HIV interventions in a community-based sample. We report on baseline data from a sample of African American crack smokers who were about to participate in an intervention designed to reduce HIV-related risk behaviors. The majority were male (80%), single (70%) and homeless (52%). Data indicated that 29% of the sample had been in a previous HIV intervention in the past 12 months, the majority in a correctional setting or CBO program. There were few systematic demographic differences between the two groups. Those who had been in an intervention reported using male and female condoms significantly more frequently on all measures of condom use, had positive condom use outcome expectations for male condoms and higher affective and situational condom-related self-efficacy beliefs. These data suggest that, at a community level, the spectrum of HIV risk-reduction programs does produce a significant improvement in condom use and related cognitions, although there is a need to cover a greater proportion of the population. Previous exposure to interventions must be a critical covariate in assessing the impact of future interventions.

AB - While there are reports of the impact of specific interventions designed to reduce HIV drug and sexual risk behaviors, there are few reports of the impact of HIV interventions in a community-based sample. We report on baseline data from a sample of African American crack smokers who were about to participate in an intervention designed to reduce HIV-related risk behaviors. The majority were male (80%), single (70%) and homeless (52%). Data indicated that 29% of the sample had been in a previous HIV intervention in the past 12 months, the majority in a correctional setting or CBO program. There were few systematic demographic differences between the two groups. Those who had been in an intervention reported using male and female condoms significantly more frequently on all measures of condom use, had positive condom use outcome expectations for male condoms and higher affective and situational condom-related self-efficacy beliefs. These data suggest that, at a community level, the spectrum of HIV risk-reduction programs does produce a significant improvement in condom use and related cognitions, although there is a need to cover a greater proportion of the population. Previous exposure to interventions must be a critical covariate in assessing the impact of future interventions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34248574222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34248574222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09540120600983989

DO - 10.1080/09540120600983989

M3 - Article

C2 - 17505921

AN - SCOPUS:34248574222

VL - 19

SP - 608

EP - 616

JO - AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV

JF - AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV

SN - 0954-0121

IS - 5

ER -